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appydoopy

How to get into game design industry?

6 posts in this topic

Hello there everyone.

I have a few questions for you all, but first is first. I have many many ideas I've come up with over the years for various games, though mostly rpg's. I just recently started getting into learning code and so far I'm coming along pretty good. Although I have never and don't expect to be much of an artist. I seem to have more of a knack for visualizing and coming up with new ideas. From what I've learned from coding so far, it will take me many many years to be able to implement my ideas into an actual game myself. and I sure don't have the money to go about hiring a team of my own. I'm wondering what kind of path someone more on the design side of things could take to have their ideas heard by actual companies who make games? I'm not saying my ideas are any good, but say there's even a possibility they could be "game changers". How could I go about making this happen?
Thank you for any feedback.
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Firstly, unless you are Sid Meier, Christ Taylor or those well known guys, chances are you don't get to really pitch your game ideas to the guy in suit over coffee. They don't let a nobody coming up with ideas that will determine the direction of a game. Real game companies that make games already have bunches of those guys with ideas, they don't need anything from outsider, (outside of company, and outside of industry). If you really want to see games made from your ideas, then you have to get a team together yourself. Kickstarter is one way if you have awesome ideas but no funding.

Last but not least, do not look down on Designer! Designer IS NOT someone who can't code nor make good art assets. Designer is someone who can do anything and everything very very well. Good designer is someone who can finish a game by himself or herself given enough time. Don't go around thinking 'Oh, I can't code and I can't do arts very well, I guess I will call myself the guy with ideas aka the designer instead.'


Hope that answers some of your questions. Edited by PyrZern
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The best way to be noticed as a designer wannabe, is to start modding games. Trust me, game companies notice you if you make an awesome mod and suddenly 200,000 people download your mod and play it (I know, it happened to me and a few other guys I know).

This way, not only do you get to implement your OWN ideas, you get to work with an existing game engine and art (hence reducing the need for those skills). It can also help you to increase those skills too depending what game you're working with, and what ideas you're putting in.

Anyways, to get noticed, get modding! Also, if you do want to be picked up as a game designer, start posting ideas for improving games on boards you know the developers are active on. Beta testing is also another good way to earn ear-time with developers.
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[quote name='appydoopy' timestamp='1353032837' post='5001422']
1. How to get into game design industry?
2. I seem to have more of a knack for visualizing and coming up with new ideas... what kind of path someone more on the design side of things could take to have their ideas heard... say there's even a possibility they could be "game changers". How could I go about making this happen?
[/quote]
1. Appydoopy, there is no "game design industry." The phrase "game design" is not a catch-all term for making video games. We call it "the game industry." How most people get into it is by first getting a degree, then living near game companies and applying. Take a look at the FAQs. Your discussion has been moved to the Breaking In forum. Go to the Breaking In forum main page and click the FAQ link at upper right. Lots of articles on how to break into the industry.
2. There isn't really a need for people who come up with new ideas. Everybody in the industry is constantly coming up with new ideas, so there's no job for "idea guys" per se. There are only a few roles from which a person has a good chance of successfully pitching new ideas for games: game designer, development company owner, and publisher executive. Read those FAQs to learn more.
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well, while the answers you received seem harsh (cruel?? hehe) ok, well, it's the truth.

Also, it's very hard to setup your dev team if you are not rich and you don't have a good initial budget.

Kickstarter is a good idea, but anyway you must have something interesting to attract people. Words alone will not work. Edited by ManuelMarino
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@ManuelMarino - I totally agree with you!

One avenue (aside from learning coding or art) that may be beneficial to idea guys with a head full of dreams is to start working on side projects.

I'm talking about taking on writing for anything from games, comics, or even writing children's books! Its good practice to get your ideas down on paper and making it easy enough to understand. Also, if you work on writing for a game; even if it's not your idea, you will learn how a team works, what is needed from an idea and design document, and make some valuable contacts (provided you don't try and interject your ideas too much and burn some bridges). [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/happy.png[/img]

Like nearly everyone has said, there is no dedicated idea guy in "the industry". On most big budget teams, I've seen ideas come from focus groups and studies or even just based off whats "trending" that very day! On smaller, "indie" teams, the ideas I've worked on stem from the team kicking around ideas and jokes that they think are fun. Indie to me is more like building a tree-fort with friends, but when you're old enough to use power tools and beer.[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

It's never just one guy sitting on a gilded throne atop a pile of cash spewing ideas upon the undeserving masses. Even the big name designers have to answer to board members and investors. The little guys have to answer to their teams and their bank accounts.

I hope you weren't burnt by the honesty, but it's very true what everyone here has said.

Good luck! Edited by DaveTroyer
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