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omegaweapon2

trying a little design

5 posts in this topic

So I am thinking of a game called Fate.

There are several characters that the player can play but the majority is that they guide the hero along the story. The setting is medieval and dragons of all kinds ran amok in the wilds.

The king can be played like a sims style where he chooses what to build per chapter, the blacksmith will get to mix items by alchemy which the hero loots per chapter.

Each decision is to help build a type of town that can help your hero grow from equipment to the npc's that help the hero's home/barracks from searching a dungeon or collect herbs in some already cleared area.

I like the game where a lone hero stands facing hundreds of enemies but there are classes of course to differ game play.

The king systems builds other helpful buildings while the market system is for trading to increase money to purchase raw materials from other lands for alchemy use.

Each chapter the player can freely switch characters but when the hero starts a quest they cannot be switched until they return to town.

As each chapter unfolds the story, the hero's personality depends on the choices in important dialogues. From the strong silent type to an insane clown depending the story ("Sir help save our children from the bandits!" choices go from serious to funny)

The story is then divided on which choice the hero picks per chapter and who he may encounter adding different story.

what do you guys think?
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This reminds me a lot of Majesty: The Kingdom Simulator. That's neither a bad or good thing, and may not even be what you're thinking of, just what I pictured on first read.

My only suggestion would be thus:
You are treading in ground that has been covered by lots of games, that (on reading your description) can be difficult to barge into. My question to you is, what will make your game stand out from the rest? Basically, why should I play your game, when I've got these 5 others already.

Always try to keep in your mind how to make your game stand out from the crowd. :)
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I'm thinking the story should be its strong draw. The hero starts as a zero and got recognized for the battles he/she fought and choices he/she made and important items that was bought.
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Oh! I like the whole picture that you made in my mind about your game! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

This is going to be a coding challenge, so I want you to be ready for it.


Clinton
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[quote name='omegaweapon2' timestamp='1353119863' post='5001682']
I'm thinking the story should be its strong draw. The hero starts as a zero and got recognized for the battles he/she fought and choices he/she made and important items that was bought.
[/quote]

Maybe doing so would unlock new characters. Why would a king bother about some newbie rat-slayer? But when that rat-slayer has grown in strength and sets out to kill that terrible monster that had the town in fear for decades, the king's support would be available.

bw,
Tobl
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