Sign in to follow this  
Lokibes

About the procedure of game

Recommended Posts

Lokibes    108
Hello everyone!

I have put in a little problem, raised from our game development team.

Since this is about the procedure of any team and even company, I 'd like to share it and glad to receive advice from you guys...


In my team I'm in charge of Game-designing. My ideas and design-documents are all good so far.

We use an effective tool to deal with playing animation in game. The tool will allow users to define rectangular bounds of each sprites in an image (which is drawn by Game Artists), then export all the information to an XML-like file. Programmer will then use code to load and display sprites as defined in the XML-like file (playing the animation).

From what I've said, will you agree with me that, this is a tool made for Game Artists, to work faster on creating animation effects?

But game sprites are refined (re-drawn) over times, and sometimes my team can't wait for Artists to update the XML-like file, or they must add some information to the file, to support the programming process ..etc...

Our leader said that adding and updating the XML-like file is duty of Game Designer.

I totally disagree with him, because a Designer is not an Artist or Programmer to implement the stuffs, just like strategists will never fight in battle field - that is the duty of soldiers (I won't say which one is more important, because WE are a TEAM). The strategist can create mini-battle field in order to show his strategy, but he will never (and shouldn't) actually fight.

Since in my country, "Game Designer" is still new, and all I've learn is from experiences, I don't really know if I've right or wrong?

I still think "Designing" is imagining and transferring ideas to ones who implement the Game, not interrupting others' works.

What do you guys think? What should I do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Sloper    16040
[quote name='Lokibes' timestamp='1353441521' post='5002738']
In my team I'm in charge of Game-designing.
We use an effective tool to deal with playing animation in game. The tool will allow users to define rectangular bounds of each sprites in an image (which is drawn by Game Artists), then export all the information to an XML-like file. Programmer will then use code to load and display sprites as defined in the XML-like file (playing the animation).
Our leader said that adding and updating the XML-like file is duty of Game Designer.
I totally disagree with him, because a Designer is not an Artist or Programmer to implement the stuffs,
I still think "Designing" is imagining and transferring ideas to ones who implement the Game, not interrupting others' works.
What do you guys think? What should I do?
[/quote]

In a small team, every person must wear multiple hats. It's the nature of a small team.
There isn't enough "imagining and transferring ideas" to keep a designer busy full time in a small team.
Are you able to update the XML-ish file? If so, why would you refuse to do anything within your power to move the project forward?
If you aren't able now, might you be able to learn how?
If you are not able to do this, why does the team lead think you are?


On an unrelated note, this is not a technical question; it's a "what's the game designer's job" question, so it will get better answers in Game Design, or Production/Management. I'll move it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frob    44904
[quote name='Lokibes' timestamp='1353441521' post='5002738']
I totally disagree with him, because a Designer is not an Artist or Programmer to implement the stuffs, just like strategists will never fight in battle field - that is the duty of soldiers (I won't say which one is more important, because WE are a TEAM). The strategist can create mini-battle field in order to show his strategy, but he will never (and shouldn't) actually fight.
[/quote]

Hopefully that just came out poorly worded post and not as your general world view.

In the real world everybody needs to contribute as much as they are able, not just as much as is convenient or whatever matches their job title.


Our designers do design, yes, but they also do so much more. Designers draw up concept art when the concept artists are busy. Designers build prototypes in flash or other tools when nobody else is able to. Our designers record their own voice as placeholder audio when nothing else is available. Designers will act as QA when needed. And our designers have their hands on all kinds of scripting and xml files far beyond what may be thought of as a designer.


Instead of asking "Is this part of my job?", ask yourself instead, "What can I do to bring the best possible game to market?" Edited by frob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Sloper    16040
[quote name='frob' timestamp='1353451858' post='5002786']
In the real world everybody needs to contribute as much as they are able, not just as much as is convenient or whatever matches their job title.
Our designers do design, yes, but they also do so much more. Designers draw up concept art when the concept artists are busy. Designers build prototypes in flash or other tools when nobody else is able to. Our designers record their own voice as placeholder audio when nothing else is available. Designers will act as QA when needed. And our designers have their hands on all kinds of scripting and xml files far beyond what may be thought of as a designer.
[/quote]

I agree totally. In my capacity as designer, I've made art, done voice acting, made technical drawings, and created programmer lookup tables. I've even soldered ROM cartridge boards. A job title is not a Stop sign or a Yield sign or a One Way sign. A "game designer" title is a How Can I Help sign.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Orymus3    18821
The best designers I've worked with are people that do exactly as I do: when the ball falls to the floor, they don't wonder whose job it is/was to catch the ball, they just do it by lack of feedback from anyone else.
Curiosity and dedication are two great qualities you should invest more in. Its not so much a matter of who does what, its a matter of getting things done. True, it may sometimes turn back against you, but as a general rule of thumb, overall, you'll be more respected if you do more regardless of the nature of the work.
In your specific example: is updating the XML a task you can accomplish? is it just mundane?
As a Producer, I recently updated game design documents. Nothing fancy in fact, just node placements on a grid, so that it would 'look better'. This wasn't really a game designer's job, nor an artist's job, and I couldn't wait for anyone to choose to do it, so I just did it.
My team knows I'll back them up like that, and it encourages the same kind of attitude in them (when its available). I suggest you bring that attitude to your team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lokibes    108
Thank you all.

It's seem I'm asking the right persons, in a right place.

I shall and should learn over and over again from this quote

[size=5]"A job title is not a Stop sign or a Yield sign or a One Way sign. A "game designer" title is a How Can I Help sign".[/size]

And thank you again Tom Sloper, for moving my post to the place of its type.

My deeply thanks to Orymus3 and Frob too ^^
.
.
.
.
Also... sorry for my bad English >"< Thank God I'm still able to understand what you've written ^^ Edited by Lokibes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this