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Shadowraix

Starting Place?

13 posts in this topic

Hello, I was hoping if some members of the community could help me get to a starting point. I currently want to be a game programmer as in handling all the code that runs the game. I was always interested in computers, so I know quite a bit. I used to play a game called ROBLOX which really got me started with its modified version of Lua. I do know bits and pieces of regular Lua, C++, and Python. I'm most interested in developing a MMORPG, or a Shooter type game. I would like to know some programming languages I should start off with, or possible game engines. I need to upgrade my computer so it can't take anything too intensive such as Unreal or Cryengine. I have been considering Unity, but I won't think i'll be satisfied until I get Unity Pro when I come up with $1,500 at the age of 14. I always want biggest and best thing I can get or else I will feel like I didn't do enough. I do plan on branching off into making my own game engine with C++. So, anyways any tips, idea, suggestions etc for a beginner programmer?
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So, you are 14.

Don't think of making MMORPG at this age, because it is incredibly hard and expensive. And you know nothing about computer science.
The best thing you could do right now, along with learning programming languages, is to comprehend basics of CS.
What I suggest is to find out what TopCoder, spoj.pl, acm.uva.es are. You should start taking part in such competitions.
Read some books, for example:
Skiena, "Programming challenges" <- this on is *really* recommended for a beginner,
Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, "Introduction to algorithms" <- can be hard a bit, but I know people at your age who can read it.

Why programming competitions? They will learn you basics of algorithms and data structures, expand your language knowledge and make a good start for more advanced things. And they are fun, too. If you are good, you can win some awards and bring glory to your country (there are great international challenges). Edited by teccubus
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As teccubus said MMORPGs are very expensive and they are done with a large group of people, but what I'll suggest you is to begin with something smaller like ORPGs(Online Role Playing Game). They are easier and almost free to develop(because they don't require a big server). What I'll suggest you is to first get the basics of platform games. Once you've done this you can study(or find someone who is experienced at) network programming. And only then you will be able to create your first ORPG. The reason I suggested you starting with 2D games is that they are done 10x faster than 3D games. Once you get everything about the platform games and network connections you can go 3D(but remember 3D games require at least 7-8 people to develop) I am at your age, and if you want you can PM me.
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Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I do realize that as a beginner I can't exactly make a MMORPG. I was a bit tired at post of this thread, so I didn't exactly mean something as big as that. Maybe just a RPG so that I don't have to get into networking yet. Like teckpow stated a ORPG could be a possible answer. I do have 1 issue with 2D games. 2D games are purely made with textures, Most of the time it uses tiles and sprites. I'm not really a tile or sprite artist at all. I have a few friends that could make textures that suite 3D games better, thats why I figured I could get into programming 3D games and possible the modeling/animations. I have a friend who could help me out on that if needed. So, I would rather stick with 3D. Correct me if i'm wrong. Right now I want to know of a good programming language for beginners. I know C++ is a high-level programming language so it may be difficult, although im willing to take it on. I have been considering C++, Python, and Java. Also maybe C# or Lua as a scripting language. @Shippou How updated are those Python tutorials? Python 3.3 and Dev 3.4 are out right now. I would figure a lot would be changed from coding Python all the back in 2.x Also, I kind of do need a fancy computer in a sense. If I was to use a advanced pre-made engine or a engine of my own and my computer doesn't have the right specifications to run it then programming a game would be very choppy, laggy and the game itself would most likely I couldn't even play if the requirements are too high. Anyways, i'm open to any suggestions. Edited by Shadowraix
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For 3D games you really need a good PC. Yesterday I saw Simpler's creations and they were made with C++ and OpenGL for graphics (link: http://simplers.org/projects.php). So I would suggest you C++, because it's more popular than the others and most of the nowadays games are made with C++. You can begin from here: [url="http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/opengl_introduction.html"]http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/opengl_introduction.html[/url]. Feel free to ask questions, and good luck!
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Well, I wasn't planning on making some high graphical game at the start. I'll start with the low based engines and I am able to run anything up to the Unity engine. I just can't handle Cryengine well and not even Unreal. So C++ it is? Are you sure C++ is right for a beginner? I mean from what i've read people say you should start out with some easy level programming language then move up. I know C++ is very complex and i'm just curious if it's best to start out with that. I took a look at the link to begin and are you sure thats the right place to start?....I always figured you would start with programming in the console then move up because it gives a base understanding of how it works.
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Well almost each tutorial, each book or each course for C++ start from the basics of the language. The other people may say so but I started C++ when I was 5th grade and it wasn't hard at all. This is a good place to start from the basics [url="http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/"]http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/[/url] , also the book "C++ by Example: UnderC Learning Edition" from Steve Donovan. As for the OpenGL use the link in my previous post. Don't worry about anything, if you stuck somewhere C++ community is huge and full of nice people. They would gladly help you. Feel free to ask questions.
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@game of thought Your kind of late. In one of my previous posts I answered the MMORPG thing.
[quote]Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I do realize that as a beginner I can't exactly make a MMORPG. I was a bit tired at post of this thread, so I didn't exactly mean something as big as that. Maybe just a RPG so that I don't have to get into networking yet. Like teckpow stated a ORPG could be a possible answer.[/quote]

@teckpow Thanks for all the help! I just have a couple of more questions. What would be the best IDE for C++? in tutorials I have watched they use CodeBlocks, but I also could get Visual C++ IDE from Microsoft. Lastly, I know there are more graphics libraries than OpenGL. If I remember correctly there is also Ogre. Which one would be better or easier to use to get more visual detail etc?
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Well I'm actually using Visual C++ 2013, but what IDE you will use depends on you, after all everyone is unique. But Visual C++ is kinda different than classic C++, because There are some other libraries from Microsoft and it's a bit confusing. As for the graphics, use OpenGL. It's more popular than Ogre. You can also use Direct X too, but if you do so your games will be only for Windows(I meant Direct X is only for Windows). For the question "Which one would be easier?" I cannot answer you, cause it depends on you(like how fast you learn, or how motivated you are, etc.). Feel free to ask all of your questions.
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When you say other libraries are you referring to ones that are already included such as stdafx.h which I believe is used for compiling faster. I believe I will stick with OpenGL since I want my games to be on all platforms. I might experiment with Direct X too. Anyways, thanks for all the help!
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Why don't you start with learning XNA? If you know a bit of coding, you can spend the time learning the API instead.

You can grow into it, from whatever level you have to start at - and in the end you you can do whatever you want with it. Or move on. If you learn one of the XNA languages, you can probably easily change to pure C++ later on. Though, maybe I'm daft, but I don't really see the point of reinventing the wheel with doing everything from scratch. I use Unity for my game prototype. Most games these days use even interpreted scripting languages for the bulk of the actual game code, while they use c++ for the things that need to be fast - like drawing images.
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If you ask for my opinion OpenGL is better than XNA, because XNA has more requirements than OpenGL, it's Windows based only, and working with OpenGL is easier than XNA. And besides XNA is made only for Microsoft's products and it's like you are doing everything for Microsoft's sake.
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