• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Harvey Weyandt

A mathematician-turned-programmer needs resources. Help pls?

7 posts in this topic

HELLO EVERYBODY.

I'm sirsuripu, a new guy here on the forums. I'm a freshman in college with a strong background in mathematics (it is my major after all) and a strong love for games, and it has always been a dream of mine to put both of these passions to work in developing my [i]own[/i] games, as a hobby or perhaps as something even more. That being said it is strange (and unfortunate in retrospect) that I was not introduced to the wonderful world of computer programming until just recently; indeed, no one in my family has ever programmed a line, and my high school's curricula did not offer any more than a class in Visual Basic! Nonetheless for the past year I have been rigorously exploring my first language, C++, with the aid of a book concentrated on its applications to game programming, but I don't think I am doing nearly as much as I should to learn about programming, the apical discipline of all mathematics and logic. So on that note, I need some help.

Upon reading some of what the forums have to offer, I have come to an understanding that programming is not a mere past-time, but a demanding discipline, deserving of more than my current investments of concentration. So, I'm afraid that if I want to take this shit seriously, and apply my mathematical talents finally to something worthwhile, it's about time I picked up the pace! My request for anyone kind enough to read this ridiculously superfluous prologue: I need some resources. I need blogs, web articles, tutorials, book/magazine suggestions, and anything else you think would help a beginner broaden his horizons in an appropriate way. Any advice on how to proceed from my current, fundamental knowledge of C++ to a stage at which I could develop something like Pong or Tetris would be a great contribution too! It doesn't even have to be game or C++ - oriented. I just want to have as much at my disposal as I can to immerse myself in the subject as much as possible on a daily basis. Any links or advice would be greatly appreciated, and I thank you in advance! See y'all on the forums! : { )
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Programming can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be.

It's best to just pick a language. C#, Java, Python are good beginner choices. C++ is a bit more difficult to learn because you have to account for, and manage things more thoroughly.

Once you pick a language, learn everything from the ground up. Just like writing a novel, you have to learn basic reading, writing, and storytelling structure. Just like math, you have to learn arithmetic and then move on to more complex subjects.

If you tell us what your plans are, then we might be able to help you pick a suitable starting language. All languages are good choices, but some are more suitable then others depending on situation and platform.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Python is the perfect beginner language. You can download and install it and start coding in about 0.3 nanoseconds. The IDLE line by line interpreter is perfect for learning to program, users can write a line and see what it does immediately. So I would go with this route at first.

However I wouldn't recommend using Python for making anything other than the TINIEST games, for performance reasons. As a programmer, you will learn that different languages are generally used for different purposes. (And there are often similar languages designed for the same purpose competing with each other, eg C# vs Java, Lua vs Angelscript). Python is not really designed for high-speed execution so it could prove difficult to get larger projects running at decent speed.

Once you are a confident programmer (and perhaps you have made Pong or Breakout in Python) I advise you to move on to C++. It's a fairly easy migration from Python to C++, just remember the syntax changes and that you have to specify the type of a variable. Then you can start using the powerful features of C++ such as pointers and custom memory management.

I started with C++. Took a lot of patience but was worth it.

(Technorati: did you know that EVERYTHING in python is created on the heap? If I type '123 + 45', that gets allocated on the heap as well :()
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you *really* want to incorporate mathematical knowledge into programming, focus on computer graphics. Multidimensional calculus, euclidean topology, differentiable 2-manifolds, linear algebra, etc. - all of these fields have their applications in CG.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C# + XNA

With C# you don't have to worry about managing memory, you can focus on learning oop (beginner stuff), algorithms and other concepts related to programming.
With XNA you can learn how to use a library for building games that will teach you the concepts of rendering/sound/input

You can then transfer your skills to C++ and skill up to full c++ knowledge, templates, generic programming, c11, io, etc
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You should find computer graphics very straight forward and logical. Programming should also be fairly easy for you, but you should also learn the fundamentals of programming before starting with a language.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0