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thornx1

Learning c++ by yourself.

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SO first i read and did examples on
http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
I made sure to understand all concepts.
Next i went through every chapter on
http://www.learncpp.com/
Now i am on
http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html
in the more advanced tutorials and went through
http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html
but most of it wasnt anything new.
My next step is to complete reading
http://beej.us/guide/bgnet/
Once i finish the advanced tutorials on cprograming.com
But from there i have no idea where to find more in depth tutorials on different subjects, all i can find are similar tutorials and nothing that goes into anything more, i want to go into network programming and video game programming and similar areas, can someone direct me to where to look next? even what to search would help.
Now, books put me to sleep for some reason, i can read 12 hours strait on the computer but not in a book so please don't give me books to get it would take me weeks to read even a few hundred pages.
I tried searching for "advanced c++ tutorials" but most forums brought me to cprograming.com and most websites besides that had no information.
Lastly is there a .rar download of a visual studios file using windows forms application with windows.h applications or just some really long program i could look at? doesn't matter what it does, i would just like to take it apart and learn how it works better with forms applications. I can find some source code but i would like the actual program files so i can see how it looks and play with it.

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Now, books put me to sleep for some reason, i can read 12 hours strait on the computer but not in a book so please don't give me books to get it would take me weeks to read even a few hundred pages.


pro tip... buy books in PDF format and read them on your PC?

Get Stroustrup's book on C++, it's a very good book to read after you've covered your basics.
Also get a book on game programming in C++.

Tutorials are ok, but they are very specific to a task.. and once you lift off from basic "guess the number" stuff you'll need space, professionalism and dedication.. thus, you need a good book.

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If you really have done what you claim to have done, you're pretty much set on the basics of C++. The rest comes from writing a ton of C++ code, preferably, non trivial software projects and experience.

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Get Stroustrup's book on C++, it's a very good book to read after you've covered your basics.
Which "Stroustrup's book"?

If you mean "C++ Programming Language, 3rd ed.", now is the worst possible time to buy it, because it's 15 years old and 4th ed. will be out in spring with significant revisions! It's also not really geared towards someone just starting with C++.
"Programming: Principles and Practice" is a textbook intended for someone entirely new to programming, so if thornx1 doesn't have previous programming experience, that might be the one to get.
Also get a book on game programming in C++.[/quote]Most of these will be kinda bad and also focus on just one technology (whether OpenGL, Direct3D, SDL, or something else). Just picking up one at random isn't necessarily going to be so helpful. I'd say there are a lot better tutorials and free internet material for game-specific stuff than there is for fundamentals of coding C++; with the game technologies, a tutorial can be sort of self-contained, whereas the fundamentals are a whole and it's important you don't miss any critical parts.

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katamari, it seems you've missed the part where the guy explains that he is not "new to programming". rolleyes.gif

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katamari, it seems you've missed the part where the guy explains that he is not "new to programming". rolleyes.gif
rolleyes.gif
He says he has read a bunch of C++ tutorials. Are you jumping into assumptions?

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Effective C++: 55 Specific Ways to Improve Your Programs and Designs (3rd Edition) by Scott Meyers is a good intermediate text. You can get it for Kindle.
http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Specific-Improve-Programs-Designs/dp/0321334876

I'd have to say that the quality of discourse in published books is of a much higher caliber than that to be found in online tutorials. You can really bootstrap yourself into some good knowledge if you just take a few months to just read. In fact, that is what I am doing now. In just a few months I have gone from total noob at C++ to kinda knowing my way around, and starting to write some original programs, basic game demos, user interface code, etc.

The key is to just stick with it because you will probably want to quit, at least once weekly. Try to force yourself to program for some hours per day, also, and do all the exercises given in the book, but do them with zeal, adding features.

Best of luck.

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How much code have you actually written yourself? Even if it's basic code, as ApochPiQ, doing is better. And this isn't one of those everything in moderation situations. The more you do, the better you get. For every tutorial you read, you should write several sample apps that utilize the contents of those tutorials. That's right, several, ie 3 or more. They don't necessarily have to be extensive samples, though as you write more and more code, you'll find the samples you write becoming more extensive on their own. You may struggle to get a ~100 line app running successfully in a reasonable amount of time when you start, but as time goes buy, and your actual proficiency with the language improves you'll find those 100 line apps becoming 200 lines apps, then 400 lines apps, 1000 line apps...

You can read all the C++ programming material in the world though, and you're still going to struggle just as much with that first 100 line app.

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I would suggest moving into some kind of pay for learning. Either get your self some books or think about joining a site like

gameinstitute.com

3dbuzz.com

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