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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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best youtubers to subscribe to

16 posts in this topic

who should i subscribe to on youtube to learn more about game development, and programming.
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Though not game dev specific http://www.newthinktank.com/ (youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwRXb5dUK4cvsHbx-rGzSgw) has some very good Java and JavaScript tutorials (and others). He does have a few Java game programming vids. He took a vote as to what tutorials he should do next and it looks like Android/Games is winning to be included next. I especially like his videos because they are condensed with all the bs removed.

I haven't really checked it out yet but The Cherno Project looks promising. http://www.youtube.com/user/TheChernoProject
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Here are the once i watched but I am not subscribed to any of them (no need).

These are C++, SDL, OpenGL, Bullet tutorials

[url="http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA191965E5A9AD158&feature=plcp"]http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA191965E5A9AD158&feature=plcp[/url]
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/thecplusplusguy/featured"]http://www.youtube.com/user/thecplusplusguy/featured[/url]
[url="http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA72A42FCB1EA11B2&feature=plcp"]http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA72A42FCB1EA11B2&feature=plcp[/url]

person on the second link uses linux but all the code works on windows as well
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Though not completely technical. IndieChatter is a really great channel where you can learn many of the things that characterize the indie game developer life! . It's not a tutorial channel it's a vlog, but if you fell bored in a raining day go check it out!
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[quote name='vladmihail' timestamp='1354648952' post='5007167']
-What language do you use?
-Do you want to make 2D games or 3D?
[/quote]

no one in particular just looking for anyone on youtube who is talking about game development and programming.
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Its called reading books and scavenging documentation. Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it. Yes, there are great videos on varied subjects, but they are usually contributed freely by experienced (and unexperienced) people with no intent on giving you a Grade A curriculum on Youtube for free, but rather enjoy teaching sometimes on certain subjects. For example, I am sure if Dennis Ritchie and Brian Khernigan were creating C in this era, they would not make a Youtube channel off of it, but write a book, as they did. The book probably made more money than their Bell Laboratory salaries (I would assume, I have no facts to back that up, but it is almost obvious). That book is called The [u]C Programming Language[/u], and I would very much recommend it to you.

EDIT: I am sure you will run into programming tutorial series (*cough* The New Boston *cough*), however these are usually not of good quality (*cough* The New Boston *cough*). Books are edited to the teeth by an arsenal of competent and experienced professionals, videos are made in a garage by a hobbyist.

EDIT#2: I am not trying to criticize or chastise you, your questions are in a league with Einstein's compared to mine back on the old mailing lists and such. Edited by MrJoshL
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thecplusplusguy (SDL, openGL, and game programming)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/thecplusplusguy"]http://www.youtube.c...thecplusplusguy[/url]

thenewboston (He teaches c, c++, c#, java, and so on)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/thenewboston"]http://www.youtube.c...er/thenewboston[/url]

xoaxdotnet (A lot of tutorials, but I like the algorithm ones)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/xoaxdotnet"]http://www.youtube.com/user/xoaxdotnet[/url]

ChiliTomatoNoodle (directx 9 tutorials)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/ChiliTomatoNoodle"]http://www.youtube.c...iliTomatoNoodle[/url]

UNSW lectures (Lectures from an australian university, I like the Computer Science course)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/UNSWelearning"]http://www.youtube.c...r/UNSWelearning[/url]

Chelin Tutorials (In spanish, but he's very good. Java, python, C, pygame, and java game development)
[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/ChelinTutorials"]http://www.youtube.c...ChelinTutorials[/url]


And isn't an youtube channel, but I also know the free courses from Coursera. Computer science, algorithms, cryptography, and so on.
[url="https://www.coursera.org/"]https://www.coursera.org/[/url]
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[quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354678716' post='5007295']
Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it.
[/quote]

This is basically the same argument against open source software, yet people still develop, for free even.

[quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354678716' post='5007295']
Books are edited to the teeth by an arsenal of competent and experienced professionals, videos are made in a garage by a hobbyist.
[/quote]

Well, maybe edited by one or two professionals. Not all videos aren't created equal. Some leverage the community and essentially have hundreds of people pointing out errors to be fixed. I've also paid good money for books written by "experienced professionals" that I found dozens of errors in. But yes, even the best tutorials won't have the depth a really well written book would have and shouldn't be used as a substitute.
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I have a complete series where I build a memory match game from scratch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGQv7bR6zCQ&list=PLDFB7FFF90EE6F0C1
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[quote name='Goran Milovanovic' timestamp='1354690135' post='5007319']
I have a complete series where I build a memory match game from scratch: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGQv7bR6zCQ&list=PLDFB7FFF90EE6F0C1[/media]
[/quote]

I have looked over your tutorials and very pleased with the content. I myself am a huge fan of Python, but for now I will be leaving this wagon to head over to OpenGL using C++. The only thing discouraging me from staying in python because it really isn't applicable in professionally for games, but is good in practice and understanding OpenGL with a very easy language. Hopefully you can try and convince my understand, because I am very fond of Python, but C++ has this "speed per se, if you get extremely technical which is more advance, but all around Python can compete with C++. Edited by Cdrandin
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[quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354678716' post='5007295']
Its called reading books and scavenging documentation. Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it. Yes, there are great videos on varied subjects, but they are usually contributed freely by experienced (and unexperienced) people with no intent on giving you a Grade A curriculum on Youtube for free, but rather enjoy teaching sometimes on certain subjects. For example, I am sure if Dennis Ritchie and Brian Khernigan were creating C in this era, they would not make a Youtube channel off of it, but write a book, as they did. The book probably made more money than their Bell Laboratory salaries (I would assume, I have no facts to back that up, but it is almost obvious). That book is called The [u]C Programming Language[/u], and I would very much recommend it to you.

EDIT: I am sure you will run into programming tutorial series (*cough* The New Boston *cough*), however these are usually not of good quality (*cough* The New Boston *cough*). Books are edited to the teeth by an arsenal of competent and experienced professionals, videos are made in a garage by a hobbyist.

EDIT#2: I am not trying to criticize or chastise you, your questions are in a league with Einstein's compared to mine back on the old mailing lists and such.
[/quote]

am not just looking for tutorials. also looking for stuff like plain out game development and programming talks and opinions. you know like podcast stuff.
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[quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354678716' post='5007295']
Its called reading books and scavenging documentation. Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it. Yes, there are great videos on varied subjects, but they are usually contributed freely by experienced (and unexperienced) people with no intent on giving you a Grade A curriculum on Youtube for free, but rather enjoy teaching sometimes on certain subjects. For example, I am sure if Dennis Ritchie and Brian Khernigan were creating C in this era, they would not make a Youtube channel off of it, but write a book, as they did. The book probably made more money than their Bell Laboratory salaries (I would assume, I have no facts to back that up, but it is almost obvious). That book is called The [u]C Programming Language[/u], and I would very much recommend it to you.
[/quote]

Wow. That looks like the post my father would write.
You don't know how many people is currently watching youtube, do you?
There are hundreds of channels earning their living out of youtube only based on the google-ads program and by having people watching it (they do not need to click the ads).
Plus, many institutions like Stanford University and such are not seeking money but viewers. So they upload many classes for everyone to watch and learn.

@OP
To learn programming:
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/StanfordUniversity/videos?flow=grid&view=1"]Stanford University[/url]
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/UNSWelearning/videos?flow=grid&view=1"]Univeristy of New South Wales[/url] (Look for Richard Buckland videos for example)

Indie people:
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/LusikkaMage"]Rachel Morris (Moosader)[/url]
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/GyroVorbis"]Gyrovorbis (Adventures in Game Development)[/url]
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/trufun202/videos?flow=grid&view=0"]Tru Fun[/url] (he was working on a cool remake of Golvellius)
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/hebronsawyers/videos?flow=grid&view=0"]HebronSawyers[/url] (I believe he was working on some cool stuff as well)

Gameplay of unknown indie games:
- [url="http://www.youtube.com/user/Slumlord27/videos?flow=grid&view=1"]Slumlord27[/url]

Not youtube... great, complete and free courses:
- [url="https://www.coursera.org/category/cs-programming"]Coursera[/url] Edited by kuramayoko10
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[quote name='kuramayoko10' timestamp='1354972557' post='5008482']
MrJoshL, on 04 December 2012 - 09:38 PM, said:
Its called reading books and scavenging documentation. Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it. Yes, there are great videos on varied subjects, but they are usually contributed freely by experienced (and unexperienced) people with no intent on giving you a Grade A curriculum on Youtube for free, but rather enjoy teaching sometimes on certain subjects. For example, I am sure if Dennis Ritchie and Brian Khernigan were creating C in this era, they would not make a Youtube channel off of it, but write a book, as they did. The book probably made more money than their Bell Laboratory salaries (I would assume, I have no facts to back that up, but it is almost obvious). That book is called The C Programming Language, and I would very much recommend it to you.

Wow. That looks like the post my father would write.
You don't know how many people is currently watching youtube, do you?
There are hundreds of channels earning their living out of youtube only based on the google-ads program and by having people watching it (they do not need to click the ads).
Plus, many institutions like Stanford University and such are not seeking money but viewers. So they upload many classes for everyone to watch and learn.

@OP
To learn programming:
- Stanford University
- Univeristy of New South Wales (Look for Richard Buckland videos for example)

Indie people:
- Rachel Morris (Moosader)
- Gyrovorbis (Adventures in Game Development)
- Tru Fun (he was working on a cool remake of Golvellius)
- HebronSawyers (I believe he was working on some cool stuff as well)

Gameplay of unknown indie games:
- Slumlord27

Not youtube... great, complete and free courses:
- Coursera
[/quote] My point was not that there isn't these things, so to speak, but that you can't just go on a youtube channel and it be your one stop shop for all knowledge game development, like a "make minecraft" tutorial. Yes, I realize there are great videos on everything, but they aren't all on a single channel, and quality GREATLY varies.
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[quote name='MrJoshL' timestamp='1354986388' post='5008528']
[quote name='kuramayoko10' timestamp='1354972557' post='5008482']
MrJoshL, on 04 December 2012 - 09:38 PM, said:
Its called reading books and scavenging documentation. Youtube (or Vimeo, or 10,000 other sites) is completely free, and what money is possibly earned from it is very little. If someone made a video tutorial about how to make a game, baby-stepping you all along through programming and content (which I haven't heard of, as it would take VERY long to create such a thing, time is expensive for a skilled programmer), why would they offer it up for free on the internet, thus wasting time worth $2400 (programmer earns 60k a year, $30 per hour, takes 2 weeks to make a pong or tic-tac-toe tutorial series, probably), and not earning anything off of it. Yes, there are great videos on varied subjects, but they are usually contributed freely by experienced (and unexperienced) people with no intent on giving you a Grade A curriculum on Youtube for free, but rather enjoy teaching sometimes on certain subjects. For example, I am sure if Dennis Ritchie and Brian Khernigan were creating C in this era, they would not make a Youtube channel off of it, but write a book, as they did. The book probably made more money than their Bell Laboratory salaries (I would assume, I have no facts to back that up, but it is almost obvious). That book is called The C Programming Language, and I would very much recommend it to you.

Wow. That looks like the post my father would write.
You don't know how many people is currently watching youtube, do you?
There are hundreds of channels earning their living out of youtube only based on the google-ads program and by having people watching it (they do not need to click the ads).
Plus, many institutions like Stanford University and such are not seeking money but viewers. So they upload many classes for everyone to watch and learn.

@OP
To learn programming:
- Stanford University
- Univeristy of New South Wales (Look for Richard Buckland videos for example)

Indie people:
- Rachel Morris (Moosader)
- Gyrovorbis (Adventures in Game Development)
- Tru Fun (he was working on a cool remake of Golvellius)
- HebronSawyers (I believe he was working on some cool stuff as well)

Gameplay of unknown indie games:
- Slumlord27

Not youtube... great, complete and free courses:
- Coursera
[/quote] My point was not that there isn't these things, so to speak, but that you can't just go on a youtube channel and it be your one stop shop for all knowledge game development, like a "make minecraft" tutorial. Yes, I realize there are great videos on everything, but they aren't all on a single channel, and quality GREATLY varies.
[/quote]

While I agree with what you say really I don't think the OP is just looking for a video as a replacement for everything else to learn. I think it is a long the lines of we all like to hear someone else that, well, speaks our language.
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