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Christoher Randin

I have decided I want to make a game, finally, now how should I get started

5 posts in this topic

Well, as the title says. I now want to decide on using a game engine to see how they work and to finally create a decent game. The thing is how to different engines present themselves when put on portfolio and possibly being seen by future employeers. I have the thought that if you don't use the more "traditional" game engines then game companies we have some bias. For example, if I prefer using Python, what if I wanted to use Panda3D or The Blender Game Engine to create my game versus the more traditional engines such as Unreal or Unity, etc. Will that have affect on the implicit "quality" of the game, as in "Eh it was made in Blender, we want those familiar with advance engines" type of comments.

Also, if someone could push me in the right direction. My game is a 3D modeled at strict 2D camera view. I have never used an engine before so I am hope to talk a lot from this and be a learning experience. Which engine would be able to handle platformer type games using 3D model imports. Also, if it could be free and when you do suggest an engine could you link the license or possibly a summary of the licencing agreement if I do want to give the game out, I don't want to do this for profit, but as a learning experiencing for myself.
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Maybe take a look at this list of game engines: [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines[/url]
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Blender is still very popular and a great alternative for those who can't afford the other applications of its kind. If you remade a scene out of a movie in blender and it looked amazing, almost life like and showed that to a employer I would think (?) he wouldn't care where you made it.

As far as the license goes, I have no idea. But pretty much any engine will give you that functionality. Given some engines don't import all the same formats but that just comes down to what you are making your models with. What language are you planning on using? (Sorry If i missed it your first post. I reread it a few times to be sure it wasn't there.)
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Hi,

maybe you should try "Irrlicht". This engine has a pretty good reputation ... I'll give it a try, since XNA seems to not be supported anymore. What is pretty nice about "Irrlicht" is the fact that you can use 3DS Max for modelling and export the models with animation as .X-files.
[url="http://irrlicht.sourceforge.net/"]http://irrlicht.sourceforge.net/[/url]

But if you just get started with your game you maybe should first do a requirement document. This is pretty usefull especially if you are not sure about all aspects of your game.
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[Edit: sorry you didn't even mention a preferred language, if its not C# ignore this post]

Since your just starting I think you should just make a game first, use a high level framework like XNA - or these days monogame and not worry about a engine.

MonoGame is a "open source implementation of the XNA framework", the MonoGameTeam themselves have said once that have a 1:1 compatibility with the XNA framework has been reached they will start adding more features to MonoGame (because clearly Microsoft has dropped XNA). This includes DirectX11 interop for windows (currently its using OpenGL on most platforms).

Not only does monogame have extensive documentation (you can look at the XNA documentation), you can also target almost every platform you'd want to target... Windows Desktop, Windows Metro, Linux, Mac, iOS, Android and some others...

I have ported a small XNA game to Mac and I was very impressed. Edited by Xanather
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