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artisticspider

Project Obscura

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I'm starting to take a liking to the idea of making music to use in games. I've never thought much about it in the past, but its certainly a great outlet. A friend of mine told me I should check around for sites like these, and I must say, this is the best thus far. Before I offer anything up to anyone, I'd like a little more feedback on my works. I don't share it that often, so I have little idea how the public may view it.

I have recently posted a (roughly) 7 minute song on my soundcloud (Ambient Masses in the Murder Garden) revealing 10 different segments of songs I've been working on. Hits quite a number of different emotions. I figure its a good starter into allowing people to (more quickly) become familiar with my overall sound. Granted, I do much more than just orchestra style songs, but Project Obscura is mostly dedicated to just that. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.png[/img]

There are 2 other (full) songs posted there as well if you find yourself wanting to hear more completed pieces. (And as far as music for games, I know that there is quite a bit too much going on in some of these, and would be distracting to a player, I'm just looking for general criticism) [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

[url="http://www.soundcloud.com/projectobscura"]http://www.soundclou.../projectobscura[/url]

Thanks in advance! Hope you enjoy
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Hi there,

 

This is only my second post on this site, but I think your music sounds really good. I do agree with you, that too many things might be happening at once in terms of the tracks, but that all depends on what kind of game we're talking about.

I am no music expert, but I really like your work.

 

May I ask what Project Obscura is? Is it a game your making music for? Or is it just the name of the collection of game music you are creating?

Keep it up =D

 

Balt

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Disclaimer: I'm currently listening on my laptop speakers so take that into account. :P

 

There's some nice ideas here! The cello samples leave quite a bit to be desired. I like the neo-classical-like influences in your writing, a nice touch for game music. I'll leave some of my comments about production for later, when I'm listening on my studio set up and better able to hear things. Some really interesting textures and different moods! One production tip: At least on these laptop speakers I do feel like some instruments could use a bit more tail in their reverb.

 

Like Balt, I'm curious if this is just a suite of cues that you're writing for yourself or for an actual project.

 

Thanks!

 

Nate

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Thanks for the comments! The name "Project Obscura" is for my own personal collection of symphonic and interestingly textured music. I throw all different styles of mine under different project names to categorize them. However, everything I post is available for any other outside projects who may want to use them. I'd actually love to be a part of a bigger project though, for sure. (Hence the reason I've come here biggrin.png )

Its funny you'd pick out the cello of all instruments as missing something. I must say, I agree 100% with that. The issue is that I am currently lacking a severe amount of articulations for that instrument with my current libraries. What articulations I do have sound great, but I can't piece them together the way I'd actually like them to be played. Its close, but there is something unnatural about the way some of them flow together, in my opinion. I've actually thought about hiring in actual cellists until I eventually have one of my own (and make the time to learn it fluently) , but that will have to wait for when funds are readily available.

Your reverb comment makes some sense too. Most of these instruments were recorded with their fully natural verbs in designated studios, but I do believe that in a few instances I actually cut down the reverb on say the piano, or just a random instrument here or there because on my own setup, which is pretty alright, those reverbs began to sound like they were overwhelming. Definitely something I need actual studio monitors for. They sound ok on my Logitech gaming setup, but I know that eventually investing in good studio monitors will help tremendously with getting those more precise details under control.
  

 

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I'm really digging your overall sound here, and I particularly really, really like Andrendina, are those fast little violin licks from gypsy?

 

The one place where a specific sample sticks out is the cello as mentioned above, specifically in clip "c" of ambient masses. Maybe I'm wrong, but it sounds like it's a little "out of the mix," maybe try throwing some reverb on it to make it "stick". Other than that I think you're stuff is really good, it's exactly the type of stuff I like to listen to. biggrin.png

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