• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
cbtb95

Need to interview a game designer for school project.

11 posts in this topic

We are suppose to interview someone in the career field we are planning on doing, and I am planning on becoming a game designer. All I need are some reasonable answers to a few questions. Also i need your name and the name of your employer or company.(Not really required, i can just make a name up if you wish)
1) What initially interested you in game design?
2) What is the education/training needed?
3) What are you responsibilities as a game designer?
4) What are the advantages of being a game designer?
5) What are the disadvantages?
6) How do government laws / regulations effect your career?
7) Any advice you would give for someone trying to become a game designer.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1) What initially interested you in game design?

I was tired of seeing lots of bad and flawed games coming out constantly and if no one can make a game I can enjoy then I'll have to do it myself.


2) What is the education/training needed?

You should at minimum have a passion for playing games. Just like a cook needs to enjoy eating food.
Then it definitly helps if you are pro at playing games just like it helps to have a excellent taste for tasting food.. so you know if it needs more salt or whatever spice.. same thing with wine tasters.

But just being a pro gamer won't get you far, Like for example I was really bored of seeing most AA mmorpg's using very similar combat mechanics as world of warcraft.
But if you have knowledge about game design you will know that the reason a lot of the AA mmorpg's have used those mechanics is to remove incentive for cheaters.
Because cheating can't be prevented.. only remove their incentive.
That's just one of many reasons you need game design knowledge not just gaming experience.

You should also have at least a basic understanding of how development (programming + art) is done so you at least have a rough idea of what limitations you have and what you can design.. so you don't make designs that are crazy and can't be made.


3) What are you responsibilities as a game designer?

Responsibilities as game designer in practise is doing the art for the game or programming.
Then you also need to throw in some good ideas on what to implement into the game or else you're just a programmer.
It's a sad truth that's what game designers really are in practise. No one wants a real game designer.

You could also become a game designer by creating a company and hiring a team of developers to become your employees and work for you.
Then you can assume the role of a real designer.


4) What are the advantages of being a game designer?

From a business standpoint there's no real advantages.. you're a team and your goal is to make a sucessfull game together and make money of it.
From an entertainment standpoint then the advantage is that you can make a game the way YOU like it.

5) What are the disadvantages?

No one really wants a game designer in their team unless this game designer can also do programming or art for the game.


6) How do government laws / regulations effect your career?

It don't.


7) Any advice you would give for someone trying to become a game designer.

Learn how to program or if you have an artistic ability then become an artist.
Or have deep pockets.

Good luck!
-4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No offence intended glhf, but the OP is looking for responses from a professional game designer, and given you didn't mention it yourself I feel compelled to point out that you are not; as someone who has yet to complete and release a game you're not even really a hobbyist designer yet, and as usual there are a number of points where your answers do not accurately reflect typical industry practice, but rather seem to be loosely based on your own viewpoint of how some hobbyist and indie development sometimes works.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='jbadams' timestamp='1354992852' post='5008562']
No offence intended glhf, but the OP is looking for responses from a professional game designer, and given you didn't mention it yourself I feel compelled to point out that you are not; as someone who has yet to complete and release a game you're not even really a hobbyist designer yet, and as usual there are a number of points where your answers do not accurately reflect typical industry practice.
[/quote]

That is your opinion :)

I just answered the OPs questions he can decide for himself if it sounds legit or not.

Also, you don't really know what I've done..
If I have/will make/made a game then I for sure wouldn't link that game to this name since I've got a lot of haters and that could hurt the reputation of the game hehe. Edited by glhf
-3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also I have a theory about how the rare few "real" game designers became successful.

1.
They started out their game biz career as a programmer or artist and then after making at least one game they got respected in the scene and then people wanted him/her as a designer.
This one isn't just a theory actually, I've read at more than a few places of game designer telling that this is what they did.

2.
Lucky people that have a programmer as a close childhood friend or someone in family who can program or just got lucky and made a friend who don't mind someone else deciding how everything should be made in the game.
This one isn't just a theory either.

3.
If you're a girl then there's a lot of guys out there who will bring you on the team just for that reason.
Especially if you went to some irl school related to programming or game development.
This one is a theory.

4.
I know for a FACT that some successful game designers haven't actually done anything at all.
They just have a really nice boyfriend who did all the work but put the girlfriend/wife name in at least one of the job titles that seem believable.
Like game designer. programmer wouldn't be believable if she can't program.

I'm not being a sexist btw.
I just honestly haven't heard of this happening to a man.. just to women.
Probably because there are more men in the game biz than women.
Please enlighten me with links if a man has gotten lucky this way too.
-8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't understand how people like you can get a positive reputation from making complete offtopic posts with only purpose to berate other forum users just because you don't agree with in this case mine opinion.

I just tried to help the OP by giving my own view on this all.

This forum is for users all over the world.. with many different and varying opinions.. you have to keep an open mind and respect others opinions.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Víktor Bautista i Roca' timestamp='1355008495' post='5008626']
Hi, I'm not sure if this will help you at all, because I'm a European author of (non video) games, but hey, you can just ignore me.

My name is Víktor Bautista i Roca and right now I work for no company. Here you can see some of the games I've authored [url="http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgamedesigner/8037/viktor-bautista-i-roca"]http://boardgamegeek...bautista-i-roca[/url]

[...]
[/quote]

I just want to say good post! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

And to those that never believe or pay any respect to my opinions and views just because they see a negative reputation..
This guy is an example of what I said in my first post.
You have to do a lot more than just game design.. this guy knows how to and does art for the game and even knows how to program his own prototypes which is actually not that easy and I would take a guess it's just as hard as making a complete game just that making a complete game takes ofcourse a million times more time..
Even with game maker it takes a lot of work and experience in game programming to make a prototype for a game.
He does it all by himself too... programming.. art.. game design.

Once again, good post. Edited by jbadams
Trimmed down some unnecessary content from the quote: you do not need to quote a lengthy post in it's entirety when you are responding immediately after it.
-6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote]this guy knows how to and does art for the game and even knows how to program his own prototypes which is actually not that easy and I would take a guess it's just as hard as making a complete game just that making a complete game takes ofcourse a million times more time...[/quote]


I guess you have not really read my post, or clicked on the link. I know how to program, yes, but I don't program any prototypes, as my games are "mortar and brick" games, like the ones in the given link.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Víktor Bautista i Roca' timestamp='1355011511' post='5008641']
[quote]this guy knows how to and does art for the game and even knows how to program his own prototypes which is actually not that easy and I would take a guess it's just as hard as making a complete game just that making a complete game takes ofcourse a million times more time...[/quote]


I guess you have not really read my post, or clicked on the link. I know how to program, yes, but I don't program any prototypes, as my games are "mortar and brick" games, like the ones in the given link.
[/quote]

haha right, sorry for misunderstanding.
but I still know that a lot of game designers do what you do for video games as well.
-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0