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Dugusadams

Finished book on C++ where do I go from here

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Dugusadams    105
I just finished Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ but I have no idea how to start game development. Can anyone recommend a book that teaches game programming for people who already know a little c++

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L. Spiro    25621
You aren’t ready to learn graphics coding, game architecture, sound programming, etc.
From the sounds of it, you have exactly the experience of reading one book.

Have you actually coded anything?
Can you even make a window in Windows®?

Where do you go from here? To your nearest compiler.
What do you do next? Practice what you have studied. You haven’t even gotten a good feel for the language yet—trying to apply too many new concepts on top of that is just going to burn you out. Don’t be in such a hurry. Everyone learns one step at a time.


L. Spiro Edited by L. Spiro

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Aldacron    4544
I want to reinforce L. Spiro's recommendation to practice. Practice, practice, practice. A good way to do that at this stage is to make several little console-based apps and games using standard input and output (cin & cout). Examples: a number guessing game, an app that performs a number of different conversions (km<->miles, lbs<->kg, etc...), blackjack using numbers to represent the cards, a small text-based adventure game where the player is offered multiple choices for each step of the game, another adventure game where the player can directly input commands to move around, and so on. Each little app you make will help you become more familiar and comfortable with the language and the process. And as your apps get progressively more complex you'll learn more along the way. Eventually, you'll be ready to look into moving beyond the console and into the world of 2D games. Doing otherwise will likely result in a much longer learning process accompanied by a good deal of frustration, disappointment, and unfinished projects.

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Liuqahs15    819
I always found text adventures super boring to implement. If you know how to use fstream, maybe it'd make more sense. But otherwise, here are some more interesting ideas:

Hangman
Tic tac toe
a calculator - you can decide how to implement it and what 'extra' features you want to add. I remember implementing factorial and exponents. That was moderately challenging as a beginner because I had never had to think about implementing even something so simple before. But it helps you think more like a programmer.

If you wanna practice memory management and OOP, make a "database" program, where the user specifies the number of entries in the database, and fills out info. The entries can be an array of objects, and the user fills out info that's put into their member variables. Again, unless you use fstream or i/o redirection in unix, this'll be a little odd, but why not? It's pretty interesting.

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Riphath    151
I'm sure that there are plenty of practice books out there, but I think a lot of people would agree that you don't really need one. Make up some challenges for yourself. Learn how to break a problem down into its individual parts and figure out how to solve it and put it in code. If you are really at a lack for ideas, whenever I need to sharpen my skills or refresh myself on a language I haven't used in a while, I google search for "programming puzzles" and or something similar. Things like the classic "print the numbers 1 to 100, except for the multiples of 3 print foo, multiples of 5 print bar, multiples of both print foobar". Usually there are answers somewhere on the net, so you know if you have a bug and got it wrong, and you can also check to see if the answer code is faster or better written than yours, so that you know where you can improve. Other than that, just try to make some simple games like Pong, Breakout, or Tetris, or simple text based games. I hope that helps!

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jbadams    25676
I don't know of any books that just offer exercises, but try some exercises from [url="http://projecteuler.net/"]Project Euler[/url] and [url="http://codekata.pragprog.com/"]Code Kata[/url]. Most "learn to program" type books also offer some exercises that go with the material as it is taught. The lessons at [url="http://www.learncpp.com/"]LearnCpp.com[/url] are quite good and include quiz questions with solutions, so you might also try those.

Otherwise you can do as suggested and just set progressively more difficult goals to approach. [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]

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Poigahn    598
Alot of very good suggestions on where to go next or what to do next.
I would like to just add 1 thing to all of the above - As you start coding, also include some game mechanics of simple Table Top games that you all ready know.
For example - Roling dice - 2 dice = 2 sets of random numbers - Programming that and looking at the results ( Individual results as well as combined results ) re-inforces your learing experience if you can apply these newly learned skills to something that interest you.
Doing a text based set of cards - Moving around a virtual Game board combines rolling dice ( Random Numbers ) as well as contrlling location say on a 40 square game board and getting back to the beginning adds data elements.
At least for learning while doing what I wanted greatly helped me. Build from there everytime you turn on the computer, set a new simple goal, acheive it and build more.

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black_darkness    280
I read this book also. I learned a-lot from it. But I never really needed another book. I suggest reading on the internet. There is only so much a book can teach you and if you get another one you will probably be recovering a-lot of bases and get bored. I think Bjarne Stroustrup wrote a primer also but I think that is for reference only. Here are some c++ practice problems you could use. http://www.cprogramming.com/challenge.html

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