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resiak

Galaxy for Hire - Kickstarter Project

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Hey Everyone! I'm the lead programmer for Galaxy for Hire, a cooperative hero-based tower defense game. We just launched our Kickstarter campaign. Check it out and let me know what you think.

[url="http://kck.st/RSopGK"]http://kck.st/RSopGK[/url]

Thanks!
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[b]your game looks very nice and although i am not a big fan of tower defense based games i hope you will make it till the end[/b]. and that's lead me to my second thought: 300k is a little bit an overestimation, maybe making the game will cost 300k but you can not expect kickstarters to cover your whole deal, you are not famous game studio or anything like that (i didn't see a record of previous work on your site, maybe i missed something?!).

ps: playing against your friends is way more fun than playing alongside them against AI :)
ps2: i don't like your contact form in your website. 5+2= is a little bit static and provides little to no (tower) defense against bots :)
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[quote name='DpakoH' timestamp='1355385080' post='5010097']
[b]your game looks very nice and although i am not a big fan of tower defense based games i hope you will make it till the end[/b]. and that's lead me to my second thought: 300k is a little bit an overestimation, maybe making the game will cost 300k but you can not expect kickstarters to cover your whole deal, you are not famous game studio or anything like that (i didn't see a record of previous work on your site, maybe i missed something?!).

ps: playing against your friends is way more fun than playing alongside them against AI [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
ps2: i don't like your contact form in your website. 5+2= is a little bit static and provides little to no (tower) defense against bots [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
[/quote]

Thanks DpakoH. It really is much more than just a typical tower defense game though. We have modes that stress the entire gamut between hero-focused combat and tower-focused strategy.


300k is what it will cost to finish the current vision of the game in a year's time. We have been working on the project in our spare time after work and school for almost 2 years. We feel that we are far enough along on our prototype to show our dedication and quality of work. Now we just need the support of the community to help us with the final push.
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[quote name='resiak' timestamp='1355431045' post='5010331']
300k is what it will cost to finish the current vision of the game in a year's time. We have been working on the project in our spare time after work and school for almost 2 years. We feel that we are far enough along on our prototype to show our dedication and quality of work. Now we just need the support of the community to help us with the final push.
[/quote]

It's very unlikely however that you will raise $300K, even though your prototype is very good. And as I'm sure you know, if you fail to make the asked for amount, you get nothing. If you set the value to something more realistic, such as $50, you actually have a decent chance of raising the funds, which will give you a nice boost to help you along the way. Then in a few months time when you have an even better prototype, you can start another fundraising campaign.
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[quote name='LennyLen' timestamp='1355444126' post='5010406']
[quote name='resiak' timestamp='1355431045' post='5010331']
300k is what it will cost to finish the current vision of the game in a year's time. We have been working on the project in our spare time after work and school for almost 2 years. We feel that we are far enough along on our prototype to show our dedication and quality of work. Now we just need the support of the community to help us with the final push.
[/quote]

It's very unlikely however that you will raise $300K, even though your prototype is very good. And as I'm sure you know, if you fail to make the asked for amount, you get nothing. If you set the value to something more realistic, such as $50, you actually have a decent chance of raising the funds, which will give you a nice boost to help you along the way. Then in a few months time when you have an even better prototype, you can start another fundraising campaign.
[/quote]


I'm not sure that would be a better strategy. How many people want to donate to create a prototype of a game and not the full game? While breaking up the amount you need into smaller chunks may give you a better chance at getting some money, it's also adding more chances for you to run into problems. I think many projects on Kickstarter have a similar idea and that might actually be the cause of some the failures in delivery that we are seeing in the press recently.

We feel that it is a huge responsibility when accepting money from backers on Kickstarter. It is not a decision to take lightly when creating a project. For this reason, we spent a ton of time researching, analyzing cost projections, and budget planning to get the cost as low as we could, while still having the best possible chance of successfully producing the quality of game we expect as gamers.
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[quote name='LennyLen' timestamp='1355444126' post='5010406']Then in a few months time when you have an even better prototype, you can start another fundraising campaign.
[/quote] I agree with resiak, that sounds like a bad idea. The people who pledged money for the first fund raising are going to feel, at the least, cheated. Edited by TheChubu
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[quote name='resiak' timestamp='1355459654' post='5010469']
How many people want to donate to create a prototype of a game and not the full game?
[/quote]

I have no doubt that people would prefer to fund a final product. However, I have even less doubt that the $300,000 goal is completely unachievable unless you are already well known.

[quote name='TheChubu' timestamp='1355464451' post='5010489']
The people who pledged money for the first fund raising are going to feel, at the least, cheated.
[/quote]

Only if you lied to them and told them that they were pledging money for the full release.
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