• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Inuyashakagome16

Does it get easier to remember everything DirectX?

9 posts in this topic

I started reading the book "Beginning DirectX 11 Game Programming" (http://www.ultimategameprogramming.com/) recently and I've starting to understand the many function of DX11. However, it just seems like many of the keywords and functions through out DX11 (and DX in general) are very complex. [b]My question is, does it become easier to remember all of these keywords and functions? [/b]Because yes I am reading many of the chapters over and over, but It just seems like not all of it is sticking right away. [b]Should I be using a different book/tutorial for learning DX11? [/b]I've looked around for a bit for a decent book / tutorial for DX11 but this book seems to be recommended quite a bit. Also with http://www.directxtutorial.com and http://www.rastertek.com/tutindex.html

I guess i'm just worried I'll learn only half of DX11 and find myself lost later on because I didn't use the correct(?) book to learn.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't learn an API by trying to cram everything, you don't have to be able to recite every function and every class available, that's just madness.
Also, don't worry about using the 'correct book', or the 'correct tutorial', because these should only be reference materials and not absolute guides to learning and understanding an API.

Learn by doing.
Read up on some tutorials and try to recreate what they achieve by yourself, while keeping an API reference close so you can look up which parts of the API you should use and how they should be used. When you use these parts of the API a couple of times you'll have no problem remembering what they do and how they should be used, maybe you won't know the exact details of which parameters a certain function expects, but that's absolutely no problem as that's what those books and online references are for.

If you're serious about programming you'll encounter tons of APIs in your career, and there's no way you're going to be able to remember or learn every single detail of each API you're ever going to work with, so get comfortable with using the available documentation as reference material.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whenever you 'feel' like this, just remember back to the first time you programmed or your first experience with OOP and all the things that were confusion, overtime things made sense and you understood stuff, the same will happen with DirectX, however do note the learning curve with any lower level library is steep but once you have gotten use to it, it can become a lot of fun and you will accept the challenges with more confidence.

That book is ok for beginners I guess, but from personal experience anything with a skull hand at the front is terrible, and I am pretty sure that book doesnt cover major areas that probably should be covered in a beginners book.

Have a look at Introduction to DirectX11 - Frank Luna Edited by Dynamo_Maestro
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Radikalizm' timestamp='1355505812' post='5010667'] Don't learn an API by trying to cram everything, you don't have to be able to recite every function and every class available, that's just madness. Also, don't worry about using the 'correct book', or the 'correct tutorial', because these should only be reference materials and not absolute guides to learning and understanding an API. Learn by doing. Read up on some tutorials and try to recreate what they achieve by yourself, while keeping an API reference close so you can look up which parts of the API you should use and how they should be used. When you use these parts of the API a couple of times you'll have no problem remembering what they do and how they should be used, maybe you won't know the exact details of which parameters a certain function expects, but that's absolutely no problem as that's what those books and online references are for. If you're serious about programming you'll encounter tons of APIs in your career, and there's no way you're going to be able to remember or learn every single detail of each API you're ever going to work with, so get comfortable with using the available documentation as reference material. [/quote]


I'll probably try and go with that. Because I just don't want to write a bunch of code and not really understand what's going on. Considering DirectX is rather complex.



[quote name='Dynamo_Maestro' timestamp='1355505911' post='5010668'] Whenever you 'feel' like this, just remember back to the first time you programmed or your first experience with OOP and all the things that were confusion, overtime things made sense and you understood stuff, the same will happen with DirectX, however do note the learning curve with any lower level library is steep but once you have gotten use to it, it can become a lot of fun and you will accept the challenges with more confidence. That book is ok for beginners I guess, but from personal experience anything with a skull hand at the front is terrible, and I am pretty sure that book doesnt cover major areas that probably should be covered in a beginners book. Have a look at Introduction to DirectX11 - Frank Luna [/quote]

I'll check that book out! And yeah that's true that's how it always was for me. It took time but i started to remember a lot about the syntax and meanings of everything.
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It isn't always about remembering every keyword or function provided by DirectX. Yes, through constant use you will be able to recognize when you can use a function available by DirectX's API. The purpose of the online reference is to alleviate the need for you to remember everything. My advice is to read through your book so that you are familiar with the API but not to stress memorization. Work the examples too. Programming graphical interfaces and 3D software is supposed to be fun. Do not turn it into a college course unless you are being graded and have paid tuition prices. Additionally, let your creativity guide your study.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not to mention that after you have spent some time with the API, you will probably have abstracted enough of it into classes or helper functions to be able to forget about the nitty gritty implementation details anyway.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(In response to the above replies)
That is very true. With enough practice i'm sure i'll remember all of it.
Maybe I just worded this wrong.
I got to a point in the book where it was "Lets begin on drawing a triangle." But with all that's being introduced in the chapter, I felt like there was SO much that I wouldn't remember what I needed to just draw a triangle. Mind you, I was able to draw the triangle. (Horray) But if you asked me how the information moved through the project from definition to display I wouldn't be able to tell you. I'll keep moving through the book and learning what I can, I just feel like I won't remember the process. Kind of like.. Looking at examples on how to draw a triangle on paper but not remembering the 2nd step of the process. I understand with time I'll start to remember it. </end rant>
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Programming pragma applies to API. Learn the fundamentals, not the code, there will always be a reference for that.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0