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Programmer Rami

A Paranoid Programmer

15 posts in this topic

hey awesome community of gamedev,
I'm really sick and I can't stop thinking. I want to be the best game programmer ever and I want to learn everything. ofc no one will learn everything so I want to learn most of the things.

I want to be good with engines like unity and I want to be good in making engines, I want to be good in both hardware and software and I want to have acceptiple skills in 3Ds max and character animation. I want to master C++ and I want to be good in C#. I want to create my dream game in Unity after I finish my current project and also I want to make my own 2D engine ( maybe 3D engine later).

the thing is.. I feel it's not enough.. when I uae unity I feel that am not a good game programmer and I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL. I'm really lost I can't concentrate on one path at each time one day I work on my 2D engine with OpenGL and SDL and other day I work on my other project in Unity and the other day I do some 3Ds max modeling am really lost.. I just felt like letting all out with ppl like me.. thanks for lsitening.
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Well i can't tell you that you will Master everything. But i wish to know, do you even have experience in any Programming language or have Graphical skills? I mean if you did, you could start from that language and keep evolving and so on. I can tell you i started out like you. I was so excited to make games, and though it was so easy, etc. But now at my second Year at my school as Applikationsdeveloper. I noticed it isn't so easy at all. I have to learn alot of languages like, C++, Java, Php, and so on. And i still didn't start anything with gameprogramming. Sadly to say you have to learn something first before you even start. My advice is: Grab a Book about Games programming(No Graphical based books.) that is mostly based on DOS. If you don't wanna start small then grab a book about DirectX and start learning that. You just need to keep in mind you have to have enough programming skills to understand the book.
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I have a similar problem as you. I cannot stay focused on one thing for too long. There are so many aspects about making a game that I want to do that I have trouble staying on one topic. It is okay to move back and forth. No one expects you to master unity from start to finish without temporarily moving onto another subject such as learning blender or 3ds max. What you need to do is set goals. Not just say them out loud, but write them down. Put them as an image on your desktop or something so you see them all the time. It should be goals that are big enough to be a good stopping point and to have a sense of accomplishment, but small enough to keep you focused until it is done. Then reward yourself by switching to the next thing you want to learn. All of the things you mentioned will make you a better game maker in the end.

At the same time you need to evaluate what you are really trying to accomplish. Do you want to be a jack of all trades game developer or do you want to make a game? What is your primary focus? What drives you? Either way, make tasks into sizes that fit you. Maybe have tasks that work towards learning unity and then have some tasks that work towards being a better modeler and some other ones that support making a 2d game engine. Then pick a task and complete it. Then pick another task, either from the same group or from a different group if you need something different. The key is to make a task and to complete it.
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I have had the same problem as you and it's understandable.

The thing is here is my personal goal once I am done with finals.
Side note: I want to learn as much about 3D graphics as I can, so I am stuck in the fork to by career. I don't know if i want to create engines or create the game it self with the logic.

SO, over my 5 week break I will be creating a 3D platformer with an orthogonal camera view since these types of games has always strike me as fun. Along with that I am also going to read [url="http://www.amazon.com/Interactive-Computer-Graphics-Top-Down-Shader-Based/dp/0132545233"]http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/0132545233[/url] and [url="http://www.amazon.com/Game-Coding-Complete-Fourth-McShaffry/dp/1133776574/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355770619&sr=1-1&keywords=game+coding+complete+4th+edition"]http://www.amazon.co...ete 4th edition[/url]

I personally cannot recommend if they are good books are not, but they have gotten fantastic reviews, I know the rating on Amazon don't show it, but higher level educators find the books to be great.

So, this is how I want to set me goal for this winter break. Funny thing is what if I like both making a game and creating an engine? I guess I am going to have to make more room to get the best of both worlds then, because as an independent developer it is good to be as diverse as possible.
Btw, I will be using Unity to create my game, which I have been looking over and trust me there are a LOT of tutorials out their.

Here are some if you just want a place to get started:
[url="http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE149339D08B89FF8"]http://www.youtube.c...149339D08B89FF8[/url]
[url="http://www.burgzergarcade.com/"]http://www.burgzergarcade.com/[/url]
[url="http://cgcookie.com/unity/"]http://cgcookie.com/unity/[/url]
[url="http://forum.unity3d.com/threads/69938-Unity-3-Video-Training-Course-(FREE"]http://forum.unity3d...ng-Course-(FREE[/url])-Walker-Boys
[url="http://video.unity3d.com/channel/1649856/tutorials"]http://video.unity3d...49856/tutorials[/url]
[url="http://www.lynda.com/Unity-3D-tutorials/Unity-3D-35-Essential-Training/96677-2.html"]http://www.lynda.com...ng/96677-2.html[/url] (not sure if you can use this or not, this is included with my schools tuition)
[url="http://wiki.unity3d.com/index.php/Tutorials"]http://wiki.unity3d....x.php/Tutorials[/url]

These are enough tutorials to get you busy for months, but don't do all of them. Just find what you are interested in and learn from it and then expand your learning.

If you ever have any question, research before you post, check out [url="http://answers.unity3d.com/index.html"]http://answers.unity3d.com/index.html[/url]

Remember have fun with it all.

[quote name='L. Spiro' timestamp='1355752808' post='5011690']
I suggest using ?? (forbidden jutsu) to steal bodies and become immortal like Orochimaru.
[/quote]
Or if you are lucky enough to be related to Hidan :P Edited by Cdrandin
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[quote name='Programmer Rami' timestamp='1355749217' post='5011666']
I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL
[/quote]
Wait...what?
You could make a video game any way you want to, and as long as that method allows you to create your dream end product it doesn't matter how you got there. Plenty of professional and semi-professional studios use unity. Unless you want to take it up as a project for fun, you should never "need" to make your own engine. The people at OpenGL already did that for us.
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[quote name='minibutmany' timestamp='1355778757' post='5011821']
[quote name='Programmer Rami' timestamp='1355749217' post='5011666']
I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL
[/quote]
Wait...what?
You could make a video game any way you want to, and as long as that method allows you to create your dream end product it doesn't matter how you got there. Plenty of professional and semi-professional studios use unity. Unless you want to take it up as a project for fun, you should never "need" to make your own engine. The people at OpenGL already did that for us.
[/quote]

Yes, this is misleading. People use middlewares, that's why there's Unity, CryEngine, Unreal, Ogre 3D, and all that so you don't have to always start from scratch, even among pros.

It takes time to master multiple skills. To make a nerdy analogy, a fighter-mage combo requires more time to level up than a straight-up fighter or mage.
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So tell me, why are you spending time on GDnet? Shouldn't you be working? It would seem you have a lot to do, but your work ethic is your own business...
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I think I have a good analogy for using someone else's engine to make a game. Using Unity to make a game is like using paint and paintbrushes to make a painting. No one would say that a painter is any less of an artist or his painting is not as professional because he did not gather ingredients to make his own paint, make his own paintbrush out of fibers and wood, and make his own canvas, and stuff like that. A game engine is just a tool that is available to make a game with. If you really want to game "from scratch" and not use anything someone else made, you have to invent your own kind of computer, make your own programming language, etc. A programming language is already essentially like an "engine" for machine code.
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My friend, you will end up burning yourself out. Bottom line is that you expect FAR too much of yourself.

Do yourself a favour and understand that its not how many different things you know, but the quality of each one. Yes, of course, its good to have more than one bow to your string, but an extra bow isn't much use if you don't know it that well...

To become a good games programmer requires three things...[list=1]
[*]A good knowledge of your chosen language
[*]Software development
[*]Maths
[/list]
...those three skills should be your primary concern. The rest will come naturally... Edited by Anri
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Want to become a good programmer? Then get the skill to be able to learn whatever gets thrown at you. Now that will be useful, and in the long term it may become as practical (or even moreso) than knowing everything.
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