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Sugavanas

A gaming PC

16 posts in this topic

If you want to make a 3D game, just buy a PC with enough RAM (8GB+) and 4+ CPU cores. The rest doesn't really matter. Oh, and a good keyboard.
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[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1355824054' post='5011972']
If you want to make a 3D game, just buy a PC with enough RAM (8GB+) and 4+ CPU cores. The rest doesn't really matter. Oh, and a good keyboard.
[/quote]
Uh, you might want to throw a decent GPU in there instead of all those cores. His game probably won't push it very hard but it's important to have so you don't get creatively hindered by crappy hardware.
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If you just have the intention of making a 3D game, one that's not too graphically intensive (i.e. not like Crysis), then I think it would be better to invest in a laptop so that you can make your game on the go. On the other hand, if you're planning on making a graphically demanding and/or using this PC to play the latest and greatest games, then build yourself a nice gaming PC with a good CPU, GPU, and RAM (8 GB is good to start with). Edited by Robot Ninja
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Build your own.
What parts you should spend relatively most on depends on what you intend to do on it.

SOME 3D games might not need that much CPU power but can utilize any number of GPU power for awesomer graphics.
Some might use the CPU to do graphics optimizations etc. or might simply have lots of physics simulation and other such things.
Others might need to load new models and terrain from the disc all the time.

Buy a good GPU if you need awesome graphics. Also buy a good CPU because many modern games to my understanding utilize it for graphics, and of course you might play games that actually use the CPU for non graphical processing (!!!)

If you can afford some variation of an SSD i suggest getting one because ive heard it really speeds up your computer (even if its just for the most used files like startup...)

And check benchmarks on the parts, because clock speed and amount of cores dont tell that much...
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The graphics card is more important than some of the people in this thread have made it out to be. It's the difference between playing the latest Call of Duty (that is, a game that uses a relatively dated engine) on an i5 at 3.1GHz at 1280x720 at 30FPS and running the same game on the same hardware with a better graphics card at 60FPS with all the options maxed at 1920x1080.

In other words, if you have a 3GHz CPU with two or more cores, you're set. If you have 8GB of RAM or more, you're good. But do not skimp on the graphics card!
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Thanks guys, i choose to build my own PC. i don't wanna buy a laptop i already hv two and also it is hard to maintain it and it is hard to upgrade the processors.
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I want to add that, especially if you are doing the art yourself, to get a nice monitor. If you're going to get hardcore into the art side of games, you will probably end up shelling out more for the monitor than anything else. This is coming from someone who does art professionally, though, so to me, having the best monitor is the most important part of art. If you're going to be drawing, painting, and sculpting on the computer, you want to make sure it looks the best it can, and little color differences and stuff can be a big deal.

I have three monitors that I use right now, two of which are good, and I'd say I probably have spent around $800 at most on a monitor before. But I do a lot of very detailed painting and stuff. That is not always necessary in a game. But I think creating textures and 3D models it is still helpful to have that. I'm not saying you have to buy a $1000 monitor, I'm saying just don't skimp on one and get a good one. Make sure it's big and has a clear picture, and it doesn't have "dark spots" which you're looking at it straight on (adjust it regularly if it's LCD).

HD and the best resolution you can get will help.

Of course, if you're not worried about doing the art yourself, don't worry so much about it. But having a good monitor is always nice even just for making your games that you play look prettier :) Even something low-res like Jetpack Joyride looks so much nicer on a great monitor.
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If you have two laptops, you don't need to build your own PC. You're not going to be writing Skyrim. And besides, if you have an insane power-house machine that your game runs perfectly on, what good does that do you? Most of your audience is going to have a comparatively crappy computer. It's better to know your stuff runs on a laptop, because 9 times out of 10, anyone trying your game out is going to be on a laptop or low-end desktop.

Try not to convince yourself that money or technology is the thing that's going to keep you from advancing in programming. What's going to stop you is stuff like this: Making up requirements that don't actually exist. Just sit down and program.
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For making a game, many computers are capable of satisfying your needs. You'd be surprised how many ordinary laptops, not even with dedicated graphics, will handle most - if not all - demands of the majority of game developers. As a matter of fact, it would be a good idea to get a low end computer for testing your games to be sure that your game runs on the most end user computers and also a good gaming computer such as a laptop for testing the genre of gaming geeks. A laptop gives you the same screen size or greater relative to your peripheral vision as a desktop one and gives you much more mobility and flexibility. Many laptops outperform most desktops these days and affordable, too. Plus you can take the laptop with you to check your email, look on Facebook, watch TV, listen to Internet radio - anywhere there is Wifi or your own mobile PC card.

Some powerful no cost programs such as Blender will run well with full features on the low scale ordinary computers. Look at what your software requires and meet it with your computer specifications. For example, some high priced software require a dedicated graphics card, even in a laptop.


1) Look at minimum requirements of the software and programs you will be using to make games and get a computer which at least meets that.
2) Consider what computers your end users will be using and get a computer which meets that for testing your game.
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[quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1355824442' post='5011973']
[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1355824054' post='5011972']
If you want to make a 3D game, just buy a PC with enough RAM (8GB+) and 4+ CPU cores. The rest doesn't really matter. Oh, and a good keyboard.
[/quote]
Uh, you might want to throw a decent GPU in there instead of all those cores. His game probably won't push it very hard but it's important to have so you don't get creatively hindered by crappy hardware.
[/quote]

Feature-wise, the average GPU will be sufficient. When developing, one will also rather have an IDE that reacts and builds quickly than an oversized GPU. Only when using GPU-accelerated media creation software would a top-of-the-line GPU really matter (and even then, the CPU is probably more important).
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[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1356002399' post='5012761']
[quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1355824442' post='5011973']
[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1355824054' post='5011972']
If you want to make a 3D game, just buy a PC with enough RAM (8GB+) and 4+ CPU cores. The rest doesn't really matter. Oh, and a good keyboard.
[/quote]
Uh, you might want to throw a decent GPU in there instead of all those cores. His game probably won't push it very hard but it's important to have so you don't get creatively hindered by crappy hardware.
[/quote]
Feature-wise, the average GPU will be sufficient. When developing, one will also rather have an IDE that reacts and builds quickly than an oversized GPU. Only when using GPU-accelerated media creation software would a top-of-the-line GPU really matter (and even then, the CPU is probably more important).
[/quote]
And that is why I said "decent" GPU and not "oversized" or "top-of-the-line". [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/happy.png[/img]

Also, if you want your IDE to react and build quickly, you want to add an SSD before going overboard with 4+ cores. That'll make a much bigger difference. Edited by Bacterius
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[quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1356002918' post='5012763']
[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1356002399' post='5012761']
[quote name='Bacterius' timestamp='1355824442' post='5011973']
[quote name='demonkoryu' timestamp='1355824054' post='5011972']
If you want to make a 3D game, just buy a PC with enough RAM (8GB+) and 4+ CPU cores. The rest doesn't really matter. Oh, and a good keyboard.
[/quote]
Uh, you might want to throw a decent GPU in there instead of all those cores. His game probably won't push it very hard but it's important to have so you don't get creatively hindered by crappy hardware.
[/quote]
Feature-wise, the average GPU will be sufficient. When developing, one will also rather have an IDE that reacts and builds quickly than an oversized GPU. Only when using GPU-accelerated media creation software would a top-of-the-line GPU really matter (and even then, the CPU is probably more important).
[/quote]
And that is why I said "decent" GPU and not "oversized" or "top-of-the-line". [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/happy.png[/img]
[/quote]
Well, a "decent" GPU goes without saying when you're building a 3D game.

[quote]Also, if you want your IDE to react and build quickly, you want to add an SSD before going overboard with 4+ cores. That'll make a much bigger difference.[/quote]
If you've got enough (8GB+) RAM, all of your tools and files will be buffered in RAM, which is still way faster than SSD. I've 12GB and the HD is hardly ever touched. Edited by demonkoryu
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