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slyterence

Installing Linux

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I''m trying to install linux onto my pc. I have a total of about 1.6 gigs to work with, so as far as I can see, space isn''t a problem. When I boot off my Redhat 7 CD, the install program crashes after it says "loading sbin/loader" or whatever the line is. So I do an expert setup... Not too hard I figure, just set the partitions up manually, and away we go. Not so. When I get to the disk druid partitioning screen, I can create partitions for linux, but not more than 2. (any two of / ; /boot ; and swap. The first two create fine, but the 3rd one gives an error (dammit, I cant remember what it is right now). I have windows XP installed with two fat32 partitions on my disk. The c drive (about 3 gigs), then 1.6 gigs unused for linux, then the d drive (the rest of the 40 gigs). Disk druid calls my c partition hda1, and my d partition hda5, and allocates hda3 and hda4, but no mention is made of hda2 and I''m wondering if that''s not the problem? Thanks to anyone who can help, I''m really trying to shake the windows noose from around my neck here We scratch our eternal itch A twentieth century bitch We are grateful for Our Iron Lung

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Well, i can''t really help you because I''m no linux expert myself. All I can say is that the name linux gives for your partitions shouldn''t matter. On my PC they are: hda1 for windows, hda2 for /boot and hda6 for /.

and I love that song in your signature

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You don''t really need a separate /boot partition. Just go with / and swap.

Also, you can try using linux fdisk instead of disk druid. (There''s an option to do that in the latest redhat install, right?)

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quote:
Original post by slyterence
I''m trying to install linux onto my pc. I have a total of about 1.6 gigs to work with, so as far as I can see, space isn''t a problem. When I boot off my Redhat 7 CD, the install program crashes after it says "loading sbin/loader" or whatever the line is. So I do an expert setup... Not too hard I figure, just set the partitions up manually, and away we go.

Not so. When I get to the disk druid partitioning screen, I can create partitions for linux, but not more than 2. (any two of / ; /boot ; and swap. The first two create fine, but the 3rd one gives an error (dammit, I cant remember what it is right now).

I have windows XP installed with two fat32 partitions on my disk. The c drive (about 3 gigs), then 1.6 gigs unused for linux, then the d drive (the rest of the 40 gigs). Disk druid calls my c partition hda1, and my d partition hda5, and allocates hda3 and hda4, but no mention is made of hda2 and I''m wondering if that''s not the problem?

Thanks to anyone who can help, I''m really trying to shake the windows noose from around my neck here

We scratch our eternal itch
A twentieth century bitch
We are grateful for
Our Iron Lung


First, as it''s already been posted, the fact that Linux doesn''t see your second partition isn''t a problem. Second, /boot doesn''t need to be partitioned. Leave it as is or you might get some huge faillures if you set it on it''s own partition. Now, with that said, if you could give us more precise error messages, I might be able to figure out your problem.





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What if I set the sizes of the partitions using fdisk from windows, then just set them up using the installer? Either I''ll try that or i''ll just make two partitions instead of 3. The only thing is, the manual specifically states that some bioses have trouble with boot partitions over 16 megs (oh, yeah)... is this possible, or only a problem with older pc''s?

Thanks

$£¥

We scratch our eternal itch
A twentieth century bitch
We are grateful for
Our Iron Lung

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by slyterence
What if I set the sizes of the partitions using fdisk from windows, then just set them up using the installer? Either I''ll try that or i''ll just make two partitions instead of 3. The only thing is, the manual specifically states that some bioses have trouble with boot partitions over 16 megs (oh, yeah)... is this possible, or only a problem with older pc''s?




Pretty much only a problem with old PCs that haven''t had the bios updated in a long time.

Using fdisk from windows might be a bad idea. Just set it up with two partitions, or if you have enough ram (and you /really/ want three, even though it isn''t necessary), ignore the swap partition and then try to get it going once linux has been installed.

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you can only have a total of 4 primary partitions on a drive..
if you want more, create an extended partition, then create logical partitions inside of it.

this limitation exists regardless of operating system.

a partition /boot is pretty worthless unless it is at the beginning of the drive. on newer systems, its not needed, and often on older systems too.

saai

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are there any limitations to using an automatic partition with "/"? I mean, can you not install both GNOME and KDE, or are all the user files not installed or something?

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Right....so. Right now I have an 80GB hdd. I love this bad boy. I would love more to keep my XP on here, and get 2000 and Red Hat (What version is best?) on here as well. I am scared however. I don''t want to lose what I have. I also have tried many times before and failed every time.

I completely fdisked my hdd a while ago and put my redhat 6.1 cd in. Maybe the cd was scratched or something....the installer was nice and all until the last "next" button before it would start to copy over. Then it just stopped there. So then I put stuff back on with windows and used partition magic. I tried to put linux on my other partition then. It killed the whole hdd. At a later date I found partition magic itself didn''t work right and it''s recovery disk didn''t work on hdds as big as mine (thanks for telling me earlier).

Right now I really don''t feel like going through that again. Anyone able to suggest what version of redhat I would perhaps like most, wether I would like gnome or kde more, and would want to ship me a cd of it free? `,:o) Thanks!

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Well, I used two partitions, and installed no problem. However, I can''t load a graphics system, (it installed both KDE and Gnome). When I type startx, the screen brings up a whole bunch of stuff about nvidia graphics cards, and then says "No Screens Found". I''ve run xf86config, and it didn''t help. I''ve downloaded the Nvidia drivers for Redhat linux 7.0, but I haven''t installed them yet. Will that fix the problem?

Thanks

$£¥

We scratch our eternal itch
A twentieth century bitch
We are grateful for
Our Iron Lung

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