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qah661

Selling My Game: Self Promotion vs. Game Portals

5 posts in this topic

Here's my story. I completed a Windows PC game about a year ago, but before I completed it, for a couple of reasons, I decided not to sell it. Now, I have changed my mind, and I wish to sell the game to see if I can make some profit from it. I have been considering two options; sell the game from my own website and promote it on sites such as GameDev.net, or submit it to a game portal such as Steam, BigFish, etc.

Although I would like to make some money from the game, I'm not attemping to get rich quick, or get rich at all. So bringing the game to a mass audience isn't a priority for me. Would it be better for me to simply start by selling my game on my own website? From what I understand, game publishers such as Steam, BigFish, GameHouse, etc. aren't very easy to please. Personally, I don't feel like going through the red tape to gain their approval of my game to have it published on their portals.

So once again, what is a suggested way to get started selling games? What have some other prominent indie game developers done?

I appreciate any replies.
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Well, there is always PayPal, and also Visa, Mastercard, Amex, and other card providers have their own payment API's for use in websites (not sure if it can be used in software). I know Visa has several API's, and one of them (I forgot the name) is made especially for microtransactions on websites, games, and entertaiment venues.

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The reasons to use a publisher (or ANY outside organization) are to do things that you cannot do, to do things you do not want to do, and to do things that they can do better or cheaper.

A game publisher has access to millions of people who buy games. They already have traffic. They already have trust. They already have financial services and taxes figured out around the globe.



Do you want to spend your time marketing to millions of people, driving traffic to your site, building trusts in your brand, and understanding complex international tax law?

For most people the goal is to develop games, not become a publishing organization.
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You can sell the game through your own website, or submit it to as many game portals as you wish. If you wish to remain independent, and prefer that route, these are your best options.

 

BTW you don't submit games to Steam anymore, unless you have an existing agreement with Steam, all new games need to be submitted into their Greenlight system, which is a democracy that decides on whether your game will get in or not. I have my own reservations about this system and it's flaws but I'm not going to get into them here.

 

Your other option is to release your game, then find a publisher. Some publishers want exclusive deals, others dont. Some want exclusive to a region etc

Publishers may very well look at your game and not be interested, others might be interested, but want it changed/monetized in many different ways according to your target market and current trends.

 

I'd suggest googling on indies who have gone the various routes, and see what worked for them and what didn't.

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I'll agree with frob: if you feel your game has the potential to be picked up by a game publisher or to pass Steam's grenlight process, I'd recommend to go for it. They'll be much more effective to bring your game to a wide audience, taking care of all the problems you could have with tax legislation, etc.

 

At least, give it a try, you'l then see if it's really too much red tape.

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Here's my story. I completed a Windows PC game about a year ago, but before I completed it, for a couple of reasons, I decided not to sell it. Now, I have changed my mind, and I wish to sell the game to see if I can make some profit from it. I have been considering two options; sell the game from my own website and promote it on sites such as GameDev.net, or submit it to a game portal such as Steam, BigFish, etc.

Although I would like to make some money from the game, I'm not attemping to get rich quick, or get rich at all. So bringing the game to a mass audience isn't a priority for me. Would it be better for me to simply start by selling my game on my own website? From what I understand, game publishers such as Steam, BigFish, GameHouse, etc. aren't very easy to please. Personally, I don't feel like going through the red tape to gain their approval of my game to have it published on their portals.

So once again, what is a suggested way to get started selling games? What have some other prominent indie game developers done?

I appreciate any replies.

 

Don't chose. Go with both. Self promotion ... you can start it now, this until you might be approved by others.

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