• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
EduardoMoura

Continuous Generating a 2D Level (Platform)

2 posts in this topic

Well, I have been mocking up ideas about a 2D sidescroller that would continuously generate a level. Well I have a idea on how to do this, but I am not sure its the best one. So my question is mostly,how would you go about this?

 

The "requirements" are quite simple, it should be able to generate random landscapes from a basic set of pieces, slopes, platforms multiple paths are all to be accounted.

 

I am thinking in have some sort of map that keeps each piece connection points  the beggining and the end, and it would set the pieces accordingly one after the other. Ofcouse this would need alot of conditions, but I can't think of another way that lets me have control, but still generate a infinite level.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think exactly how your game is designed would affect how exactly you would go about it. Like what the pieces were like, whether the layout was tile-based, etc. I can think of an idea where the game is tiled and everything takes up one "square," then you could just have the game spawn a new set of squares for a column once the player has reached a certain relative column. If you want the game to auto-scroll so the player doesn't control the horizontal movement of the game field, you could just have it constantly "pushing" the grid to the side and spawning new columns as it goes. It would have to check to make sure there was enough "free space" to let the player get through, and if you wanted to make sure multiple paths were available, this would take more checking.

 

You could also make it a little more pseudo-random landscapes by creating pre-made "screens" where you create entire screen-sized maps yourself with pre-placed platforms, then give each a property of which ones it can connect to on each side, then have the game "link" those screens together as the player moves. If you've ever seen Mega Man 9 or 10 Endless Attack mode, it is something like that... the maps are already laid out, but the order you encounter them is random. While MM9/MM10 use entire stretches of premade maps, you could make them just small screens and have them link together in a random order.

 

"Run until you die" games often have what I think you're looking for, and they usually use the second example (because they often get very fast, and the player can "learn" what to expect, so it's not 100% random placement of the objects). Play games like Doodle Jump, Gravity Guy, and Jetpack Joyride and you will get kind of an idea of how this kind of concept is put into play. Then adapt that to the kind of game you're wanting to make.

 

I would also go ahead and plan all of the types of "pieces" you would like to use, and create a couple non-random stages for a player to play (playable or even just in concept). Then you will have an idea of how exactly all your pieces fit together, and what requirements they have for joining each other. Once you know all the kinds of pieces you want exactly, you will have a better idea of how you should go about randomly fitting them together.

 

In the end, there are many ways you could do this (once I made a game like this in an old game creation software, where off the screen there was an object flying around and it would "fire" out platforms at random intervals like a gun lol... this is probably not the best idea though) and the way you end up doing it will depend a lot on how you design your pieces, how fast-paced you want the game to be, what kind of control the player will have over the direction of the screen, etc. Create the entire game in planning, and the path to how you should create this one element of it should open up.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly, I was thinking in maybe have certain areas already made an just stitch them together to create a new random area, I also though about the tiled approach, and I think I need something like that so that I can create really random scenarios. So I think my idea was actually to create a hybrid of the two examples you gave. 

 

But I wanted to hear other to check if they have better ideas on how to lay the system, there is no such thing as too much info. One problem that just came to my mind is there is no moving back in the map, since storing a infinitely large level would take a huge chunk of memory if the game was running long enough but in this case I doesn't bother me , since I wont need it.

 

Thanks for you feedback nesseggman.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0