• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
black_darkness

Which is faster? Drawing 256 16x16 bitmaps or drawing one 480 x 480 bitmap?

6 posts in this topic

Right now I am drawing each bitmap representing a tile seperately. I am barely getting 60 fps in my game and I want my game to have better performance than this. If I would get better performance making maps using a tile editor and exporting the bitmap and making a entity system to manage can_pass or cannot_pass or warp I would do that instead.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well, one draw call is ALOT faster on a gpu than say 200 draw calls
additionally, you should have a tile map that contains each tile on the same texture
and draw from that single texture for each quad, and avoid binding new textures as much as possible

the fastest solution is this:
one texture, one VBO, one draw call

an alternative method is using 2D texture arrays for tiles, which simplifies things greatly
since you wont need to separate textures to avoid mipmapping "incidents" due to filtering
using texture 2D array feature, it will still be only 1 texture bind

what i would try, is have 1 mesh, that consists of 3x3 planes that are tilesheets
that way i only need 1 bind, and i can render subsets of the 3x3 planes depending on camera position
it will make smooth scrolling easier (but dont take my word for it, since i do mostly 3D)

good luck
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am barely getting 60 fps in my game [...]

Do you have vsync on? Do you know what the bottleneck is?

 

@Kaptein: Are you randomly inserting line breaks? wink.png

Edited by Cornstalks
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
@Kaptein: Are you randomly inserting line breaks?

good call on the vsync! it's true, most computer screens are 60hz, and 60 fps is more than enough for animation
in movies (although interlaced), its ~25 fps!

anyways, yes, i'm having some serious issues with the forums today! each time i post, a ton of
is
showing up instead of line breaks
it's making things a bit hard, but i'm not one to complain smile.png

here is my first attempt at a reply:
<blockquote class="ipsBlockquote" data-author="Cornstalks" data-cid="5014561"><p>@Kaptein: Are you randomly inserting line breaks?&nbsp;<img data-cke-saved-src="http://public.gamede...efault/wink.png" src="http://public.gamede...efault/wink.png" class="bbc_emoticon" title=":wink:" /><br />&nbsp;</p></blockquote><br />good call on the vsync! it's true, most computer screens are 60hz, and 60 fps is more than enough for animation<br />in movies (although interlaced), its ~25 fps!<br /><br />anyways, yes, i'm having some serious issues with the forums today! each time i post, a ton of &lt;br /..&gt; is<br />showing up instead of line breaks<br />it's making things a bit hard, but i'm not one to complain <img data-cke-saved-src="http://public.gamede...fault/smile.png" src="http://public.gamede...fault/smile.png" class="bbc_emoticon" title=":)" /><br /> 
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can keep the same kind of map file you are using if you generate a background image out of your tiles the first time the cycle runs, then just draw that image each time instead of all the tiles. Make sure your not reading from the hard disk each cycle, that really slows it down.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
good call on the vsync! it's true, most computer screens are 60hz, and 60 fps is more than enough for animation
in movies (although interlaced), its ~25 fps!

 

This isn't quite correct - movies can get away with less because each frame is somewhat blurred in with the previous and next frames, which makes frame transition much smoother. Try it out - next time you watch a movie, pause it at a random point with enough movement and watch how blurry it is. 25 fps (and even 30, for that matter) is most definitely not enough for video games to appear smooth without unrealistic amounts of motion blur. 60 fps is still far from perfect, as well, but it's satisfactory for most users.  Motion blur and good camera handling can help a lot, though. This is really off-topic, though, so I'll stop here.

Edited by Bacterius
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered NOT drawing the tiles that are not visible on-screen? I'm constantly forgetting to do this myself...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0