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KingofNoobs

Ouya Compiler

10 posts in this topic

Hello,

 

How do I get my hands on an Ouya Compiler? Will it use Java like Android or can we code for it in C++?

 

-Dave Ottley

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*Looks in wikipedia*
 

(developer models ordered during the Kickstarter campaign for $699 or $1,337 will come pre-rooted)


LMAO

Props to Google for allowing rooting without voiding the warranty. Looks like they're gearing the whole console toward indy developers. Best thing since Pandora.

Ah, it says the dev release was yesterday... Let's mosey on over to their site and have a looksie...

http://www.ouya.tv/devs/

Looks like they're just adding an additional API to the Android kit. They seem to be targeting Unity developers primarily. There's mention of Eclipse. C++ is also mentioned.

 

C# also mentioned.

Edited by Khatharr
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Google has nothing to do that stuff Khatharr.

You will need to get your hands on the official Ouya SDK. But it's just off the shelf parts running Android. You can start by doing some standard Android programming now, and then get quickly port it to the OUYA later if you still want to.
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How do I get my hands on an Ouya Compiler? Will it use Java like Android or can we code for it in C++?

The Ouya is Android... It'll ship with Android 4.1, so it's merely a matter of developing an Android app. Of course, to take advantage of the controller and possibly other things, they may have some specific APIs you can use, but for the most part developing for the Ouya is just a matter of developing for Android. You can program in Java, C, or C++ just like you can for Android, because you are programming for Android.

 

I'll be able to share more details about it when my company gets its Ouya dev kit (hopefully that's just days away, now that they've shipped).

Edited by Cornstalks
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https://devs.ouya.tv/developers

Just click download ODK. Done.

Will it use Java like Android or can we code for it in C++?

It is essentially android so its java again. Seeming as you can also use C++ on android I assume you can use C++ on the OUYA (Google the NDK). Its been said that unity will be supporting the OUYA (I assume its not really a drastic change from their existing android version). Monodroid should also work.

*Looks in wikipedia*

Quote
(developer models ordered during the Kickstarter campaign for $699 or $1,337 will come pre-rooted)

LMAO
They said themselves that actually all consoles will ultimately be dev consoles. Those who willingly paid 699 or above were paying for the first run consoles. As the first run was so small (about 1200 approx) they are going to cost alot more than mass produced consoles, plus your getting a clear plastic console unlike everyone else. Edited by 6677
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Yeah the standard $99 unit is a "dev kit".

i.e. there are no "dev kits" and "consumer versions", just a single product.

 

The "pre rooted" versions were part of a specific kickstarter bundle/tier that included early access to hardware and the SDK, as well as other stuff, like marketing for your game...

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I don't believe there will be a "compiler" for Ouya, however there will be API's and "Developer" consoles.

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Google has nothing to do that stuff Khatharr.
 
Ah, my mistake. I saw the press release on Google+ and saw that it was using Andriod and assumed that it was Google doing this. Props to the Ouya people then. Pandora was looked down on because a lot of people assumed that it was just a piracy tool. It looks like Ouya is getting more respect. It's awesome to think that there will be a respected console which people can just develop for without having to mess with a bunch of red tape and excessive legal concerns.

*Looks in wikipedia*

Quote
(developer models ordered during the Kickstarter campaign for $699 or $1,337 will come pre-rooted)

LMAO

They said themselves that actually all consoles will ultimately be dev consoles. Those who willingly paid 699 or above were paying for the first run consoles. As the first run was so small (about 1200 approx) they are going to cost alot more than mass produced consoles, plus your getting a clear plastic console unlike everyone else.



Yeah, I was just laughing at the '1337'. The press info says that the consumer console will be easily accessible for both DIY rooting and also hardware mods. Edited by Khatharr
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I have a question to add to this.

Since I am developing a game in Java for PC/Mac/Linux, what would it take to make it android compatible? Just implement the android SDK or something?

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well you may have to change what libraries you use for various things, you'll need to see does the graphics library you use support android/have an android port available etc. Then you will need to rewrite your input handler for touch screens aswell, that said android already has support for hardware keyboards, mice and gamepads (did you know that ice cream sandwich actually has drivers for the wired xbox 360 controllers, just a case of connecting them which is also easily done).

Theres some more that needs doing aswell but I'm not an android dev.

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I have a question to add to this.

Since I am developing a game in Java for PC/Mac/Linux, what would it take to make it android compatible? Just implement the android SDK or something?

Not quite. The reason is because Android is designed very differently from a normal PC, despite it being Linux. In Android, you no longer focus on making a program/application, but instead you focus on making activities. Additionally, there's no "main loop" in Android. You receive input from event handlers, and can set a timer/flag to repeatedly call you drawing function, but there's no "main loop." Also, input is quite different, because you don't have a traditional mouse, but instead have "pointers" that go down, move, and then up. Android only supports up to OpenGL ES 2.0, so you have to make sure you're using that (and you may have to make a few changes if you port from some OpenGL library to Android's OpenGL libraries).

 

You don't have to rewrite your game from scratch if porting it to Android, but if you aren't thinking about Android from the very beginning and designing it to work on Android from the start, you'll probably have to make some significant changes to your project.

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