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AnthonyVelazquez

A Game's Structure

6 posts in this topic

Hello, I have been programming for some time and I created a text based RPG game and moved on after a while to create a 2D RPG game. I was fully capable of making it but it was the biggest mess of code I have ever seen and I had the worse method of progression through the story. All in all, I know how to actually program but how exactly would I structure a game.

 

Alot of people say things like Check for collision, player detection, rendering, but how exactly would that work with a 2D RPG or a RPG in general? Im gonna start from scratch again and by that I mean a text based RPG but I want to find a suitable way of creating a structure for smooth progression through the game and that way I wont end up with a huge mess of code. Any help would be appreciated

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What kind of problems did you run into, specifically? There's a lot of different aspects to organization, so if you can address specific problems that arose one-by-one we can talk about ways of dealing with those issues.

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Well for example I had one big while loop for the game, and inside the loop there would be a switch, the different numbers would each mean a room but it started getting too complicated this is an example:

 

while(!done)
{
switch(state)
{
case 0:
menu();
break;
case 1:
Game_Start();
case 2:
About();
case 3:
Close();
}
}

 

This was basically my while loop and this is an example of Game_Start():

Game_Start()
{
switch(location)
{
case 1:
town;
break;
case 2:
inn;
break;
case 3:
quest;
break;
}
}

 

Then my quest() would be the same thing as Game_Start() just a switch statements and it ended up with every single function having a switch statement and there was no organization at all. The only thing I had for organization was all of the player and monster data in separate classes. Basically I dont know how to create a organized framework or engine for the game.

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Ah, I sort of expected that this would be the first thing you asked about. What you're looking for is a "state manager". Rather than just using one huge loop you create 'states' or 'scenes' (depending who you talk to - they're the same thing) that get plugged into the main loop. The logic for the section you're in is inside the state/scene.
 
I think L.Spiro wrote a nice article about it... Hang on a sec...
 
Yeah, here we go. I was looking over this while I was fiddling with my scene manager a while ago.
 
http://lspiroengine.com/?p=351
 
As for different stages/levels you can break them into data units (the map and resources, etc required for that stage) and then have your map state/scene load the data unit, run with that data until you move to another one, then just unload the current one and load the new one.
 
This forum formatting bug is killing me... -.- Edited by Khatharr
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Assuming the above is a menu.

How about having a MenuItem object.

Each selection inherits from MenuItem.

 

Then you put the menu-items in a list (which language are you using?).

 

Then a single function which can display and select a list of MenuItems.

 

That way you don't need a million switch/cases, but just one function.

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The link Khatharr posted looks pretty good. I actually implemented something like this in a game I am working on right now.
 
What I have is a Scene class.
 
class Scene
{
void Draw()
void Update(double dt)
}
 
Then for your game loop all you do is this.
while (!done)
{
    double dt = TimeSinceLastFrame
    activeScene.update(dt)
    activeScene.draw()

    // frame rate control here
}

Then, when you want to jump between scenes simply change the activeScene. Every scene, such as a menu a level or cutscene, is a subclass of scene and has its own draw and update code. This flexibility makes it easy to create scenes that handle transitiong or loading screens. You can also easily add new scenes without having to track down and update a any switch statements that relate the deciding what scene is active. In fact, any time you find yourself using a switch statement, consider creating a class and using Polymorphism to control the behavior. If any of this seems confusing read up on polymorphism. It is a powerfull tool that will make your code much more manageable.
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