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Unmerciful

The first steps

5 posts in this topic

Thank you for taking the time to answer my question(s) and I apologize for my noobishness.

 

I am currently going to a local college for graphic design and I am getting better with vector and raster art, but that's about it. I do want to create games, but I had a really bad experience learning math in high school and that has sort of crippled me in college. Right now I am creating about 200-300 images (about 2.5 inches x 3.8) that I plan on using in my game. The game is a spinoff of yu-gi-oh but using champions from League of Legends.

 

The problem is all I have are pictures of cards, but no game. What software will I need to make a game similar to solitare but with a more advanced engine capable of calculating damage etc.. Also I may want to allow people to battle eachother so I may need a server + database as well.. thanks in advance guys!

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I don't have any real advice for which engine to use, but as far as your game concept, I would check out Desperate Gods design philosophy. Instead of having all of the rules hard-coded, they pretty much just provide to rules and the tools, allowing users to modify the game (at least in concept) as they see fit. I think it's an interesting idea that might make what you're trying to do either a little easier (as far as coding rules) or more difficult (for designing the rules).

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    It might also help to know what platforms you are looking to make this "game" run on when it's completed.  For consoles you start getting very limited on your engine selections, and either requires lots of money or lots of coding knowledge to use (At least anything decent.).  PC's have the widest range and there can be lots of various options to use, I'd agree with jbadams about trying Game Maker or Construct 2.  If you want to target mobiles or web browsers (which might be the same thing) you are probably going to start running into even less game designer kits that don't require programming.

 

    Just as a bit of personal commenting here, I would personally suggest doing this as a web based game.  This will require that you partner up with a programmer or contract out the development of a game system but will give you a very large reach of potential players (if done right you can port it directly to mobile devices).  Good web programmers can easily create web page editors for you to use to create cards and rule sets, incorporate a player / members system and there you go.  You can sell card packs, advertising space or just charge a monthly subscription.  Lots of good stuff you can do with card games on the web, new HTML 5 and jQuery animation features are pretty smooth and could handle quite a bit to make it all look nice.  You can develop a simple and quick rule system that allows you to build rule sets from a point and click interface.  Offer player tournaments and leader boards and such.

 

    Anyway, to get back on subject a bit.  You probably want to ask yourself and decide for sure what platforms and devices the end product should run on.  Remember each has it's own limitations and trying to develop for "everything" is just a fools move.  It takes to long and gets very expensive no matter how you approach it.  You will always need to purchase or pay royalties for expensive "commercial" grade libraries and licenses, you will need more programmers or more expensive programmers, more distribution licenses and so on.  Once you know where and how you want to distribute your game I would HIGHLY recommend that you partner with a coder and go from there.  I personally am not aware of any game projects that have ever succeeded without at least one programmer.

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[quote name='Dan Mayor' timestamp='1356916209' post='5015921']
I would personally suggest doing this as a web based game.  This will require that you partner up with a programmer or contract out the development
[/quote]

I'd probably second this recommendation, but just wanted to quickly note that this still doesn't necessarily require a programmer: Construct 2 exports to HTML5, Game Maker has a version which can, and there are a number of other similar packages that feature HTML5 export.  It's actually easier than ever to target the web-browser, and both performance and feature sets are being improved by leaps and bounds. smile.png

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