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Legendre

Losing all items when your character die.

28 posts in this topic


It is risky to argue that a feature, because it is contained in a popular game, is automatically a good feature. A feature lives in the context of a whole game. It might be good in one game and very bad in an other game.

 

I agree. Which is why I am not making that argument. I am only stating a fact that seem to be overlooked by the previous two posters. (and I didn't realized I spammed the same reply twice because it was very early in the morning :p)

 


You need to define the context with this in mind. E.g. if your items are really generic, drops often and are just more like tools, then item drop is really ok. On the other hand, if you have many unique items (to which the players get attached), seldom item drop and equipment which serves as instrument to make the character unique and special, then item drop could be very frustrating.
 

 

I think Runescape got away with haqving item-drop-on-death and unique/special equipment by allowing for 3/4 items to be saved. This allows generic drops to be sacrificed and avoid frustrating players by making them lose unique/special items. (Realm of the Mad God, on the other hand, tend to be more niche and hardcore than Runescape because they force you to lose your unique/special equipment)

Do you think allowing for 3/4 saves is a good way to do it? Or would it be better to simply not have unique/special/rare items?

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A map with no players on it had all item drops cleared every 5 minutes. If you died 25 seconds before the map was cleared, your corpse only lasted 25 seconds. If you died 10 seconds after a map was cleared, your corpse would last until the next clear in 4 minutes and 50 seconds. This was an unintentional side-effect of maps clearing monster drops that nobody wanted to pick up, but we liked it so we left it in.

 

This can be easily amended with a two-pass cleanup to be less "aggressive". Flag all corpses as "delete on next turn" every 2.5 minutes, and delete all corpses already flagged. If you die 10 seconds before a cleanup tick, your corpse will still last 2 minutes 40 seconds. In the best case, if you die immediately after a cleanup tick, your corpse lasts 5 minutes.

 

This is what I'd do, it has practically the same overhead but isn't nearly as frustrating in the worst case.

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I think Runescape got away with haqving item-drop-on-death and unique/special equipment by allowing for 3/4 items to be saved. This allows generic drops to be sacrificed and avoid frustrating players by making them lose unique/special items. (Realm of the Mad God, on the other hand, tend to be more niche and hardcore than Runescape because they force you to lose your unique/special equipment)
Runescape had a very nice PvP flavour with that too, in that you lose all items when you are skulled (i.e. after agressing another player). Though for some reason they gradually changed this (probably because PK kids were whining about losing their stuff?).

The fact of being skulled and the risk of losing everything was the "price" you had to pay for attacking others. Which was a fair trade-off, and a challenge.

First, it was changed so turning on the protection prayer would allow you to keep an item even when skulled (if for no other reason, this is someting I would not do because of lore -- a "prayer" should not work if you act against your deities, no matter how strong you pray).

And more recently, the entire concept of "skull" was dropped. I wonder why. So basically now you can just do what you want without any consequences, if I understand correctly. Everything you do (good or bad) should have a consequence. Edited by samoth
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A map with no players on it had all item drops cleared every 5 minutes. If you died 25 seconds before the map was cleared, your corpse only lasted 25 seconds. If you died 10 seconds after a map was cleared, your corpse would last until the next clear in 4 minutes and 50 seconds. This was an unintentional side-effect of maps clearing monster drops that nobody wanted to pick up, but we liked it so we left it in.

 

This can be easily amended with a two-pass cleanup to be less "aggressive". Flag all corpses as "delete on next turn" every 2.5 minutes, and delete all corpses already flagged. If you die 10 seconds before a cleanup tick, your corpse will still last 2 minutes 40 seconds. In the best case, if you die immediately after a cleanup tick, your corpse lasts 5 minutes.

 

This is what I'd do, it has practically the same overhead but isn't nearly as frustrating in the worst case.

 

I wasn't the programmer for that project.

 

There weren't corpses per se, the items that were equipped just fell on the ground like regular monster loot (Any non-equipped items didn't fall to the ground, but one random item from your inventory also was dropped). There are plenty of ways it could've been fixed, but we never got around to it. The project was abandoned in 2010, after four years of sporadic work. smile.png

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The project was abandoned in 2010, after four years of sporadic work. 

 

Oh wow. Was there something like a post mortem written about it? I would love to read and learn from it.

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No post-mortem - it was just a few of people who met online and made a simple 2D orpg game together. Since we never finished the game, we didn't advertise it, so we only had about ~20 active players. You could download the repackaged "single player" version if you like (the orpg but without other players walking around - put up for download when the project shut down). The project was called Decayed of Zombies.

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