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superman3275

Do You Know of Any Good, OpenGL 3.X / 4.X Book Which Discusses the Programmable Pipeline?

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I am currently working on Hooded and looking for a good book on OpenGL. I need a book which only discusses the Programmable Pipeline, as I do not plan to use any Deprecated Code. I cannot find many books which teach the programmable pipeline. I looked at the OpenGL Super-Bible (Fifth Edition) however the Author seemed like a very Arrogant developer. I've come to this conclusion considering that he doesn't teach you OpenGL, however he teaches you his own library (Which confused me, his book is labeled OpenGL Super-Bible. Why is he using his own helper library?). I've seen the free Modern Three-Dimensional Graphics Programming E-Book, however I've read the authors talks about his book and looked at it, and it doesn't teach OpenGL as much, however it is good for beginning Graphics Programming after you've learned OpenGL (This is taken straight from his answer to a question about this subject). I've also seen the OpenGL Book, and even they don't go over all of OpenGL (Or the Shading Language), it's more of a small introductory course. I've also seen Lazy Foo's Tutorials, however he spends the first thirty lessons discussing deprecated functionality and around three with the Programmable Pipeline. Do you have any suggestions?

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you can try beginning opengl game programming 3rd edition. It uses programmable pipeline with opengl 3.x, but fixed function OGL is easier

If you dont mind fixed function then i suggest opengl game programming by primatech

Edited by ISDCaptain01
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You could read the spec of your target OpenGL version at OpenGL.org

 

http://www.opengl.org/registry/

 

Say that you want to learn the non-deprecated functionality of OpenGL 3.3, you grab the OpenGL 3.3 core spec pdf. Though its documentation about "what it does" rather than a tutorial of "how to use it". Or grab the GLSL spec if you want to know all the things you can do inside your shaders.

Edited by TheChubu
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I am currently working on Hooded and looking for a good book on OpenGL. I need a book which only discusses the Programmable Pipeline, as I do not plan to use any Deprecated Code. I cannot find many books which teach the programmable pipeline. I looked at the OpenGL Super-Bible (Fifth Edition) however the Author seemed like a very Arrogant developer. I've come to this conclusion considering that he doesn't teach you OpenGL, however he teaches you his own library (Which confused me, his book is labeled OpenGL Super-Bible. Why is he using his own helper library?).

The helper library is used extensively in the first 5 chapters of the book, simply because in those chapters he wanted to focus on the foundations of 3D graphics programming without the details of the GLSL API getting in the way. There's a good deal to learn for someone entirely new to 3D graphics (part of the book's target market). Coupling it with GLSL from chapter 1 would be confusing. From chapter 6, he gets into the details of GLSL. I've seen that book take a lot of knocks, but I think it's actually decent material. It's a good approach to lead someone from zero to shaders, IMO. Most of the negativity I think is coming from people already familiar with 3D programming in general and just want the details of the programmable pipeline. I'm one of those people. I skimmed through the first 5 chapters, but got a good deal of info from the rest.

I'm not aware of any good books that focus solely on GLSL without any of the beginner stuff. In addition to the SuperBible, I found the 6th Edition of Edward Angel's Interactive Computer Graphics to be useful. Again, it's not an OpenGL book, per se, but it teaches the programmable pipeline along with the typical material from any graphics text.
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but fixed function OGL is easier
Not really. People weren't happy with OpenGL 3.x not because they deprecated fixed functionality, but because they left that cruft in.
That state system of Lighting (and everything else) was a right mess and glBegin etc... were simply too inefficient to justify using anyway for any project.
With the new system, having multiple shader programs and simply setting uniforms for each one is so much less hassle since you know the names of each one in the shader and can obtain them in a generic manner rather than remembering to use gl_TexCoord[0] or gl_MultiTexCoord0 etc....

I am usually quite adverse to change like this in such a foundation API but I am waiting for the days where fixed functionality code cannot be found in libGL provided by Nvidia, AMD or Intel. (Though admittedly it will break a shed load of closed source projects and games lol)

And yeah, I would stay away from the superbible books because he teaches using his own wrapper classes which I cannot stand.

As for books, I think I can only recommend the OpenGL Programming Guide (Red Book) and simply try to get the newest version of that you can. The OpenGLBook (http://openglbook.com/) is great for simple reference, but it also doesn't get very far since I think it was abandoned :(

EDIT: Maybe also the OpenGL Shading Language (Orange Book). Edited by Karsten_
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