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Alpha_ProgDes

How does a rock get from Mars to Earth?

11 posts in this topic

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/scientists-ancient-martian-rock-full-water-223144105.html

 

So this article says that a rock full of water came from Mars to Earth. How is that possible?

 

EDIT:  Obviously I didn't read the article carefully enough.

 

So with that said, I wonder how Earth-rocks our volcanoes has sent across the galaxy.

Edited by Alpha_ProgDes
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Supposedly from asteroid impacts. The force is powerful enough to launch matter out of the gravitation pull of the planet.
 
EDIT: I obviously didn't read your post carefully enough...unsure.png

 

I don't think volcanoes on earth have enough power to eject matter into outer space. The gravity on Mars is much weaker. Still, asteroid impacts are the more likely reason.

Edited by MarkS
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i think a super volcano's eruption might be enough to get some rocks out their, but so what, we are all stardust anyway, at the very best, in a billion years that rock "might" be the spark of life on another planet, and that's assuming all the probes we've sent out their don't eventually crash and become that spark in billions of years.

 

hell, who knows, maybe a billion years ago, an aging alien probe crashed into our planet, and that was the spark for earth.

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So with that said, I wonder how [many] Earth-rocks our volcanoes has sent across the galaxy.

 

Zero.

1. It's unlikely that anything ejected from the earth would escape the boundaries of our solar system and go off into the galaxy.

2. As slicer4 said, volcanoes aren't powerful enough to cause ejecta to escape the gravitational pull of the earth.

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2. As slicer4 said, volcanoes aren't powerful enough to cause ejecta to escape the gravitational pull of the earth.
 

That was me...
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Not only gravity, but drag too.

 

What I always wondered about these kind of rocks: how come they can preserve anything useful (like that germ fossil) apart from some traits of their original chemical composition? If there's a big enough force to throw the rock off the planet, how come the heat probably close to the force not melt the crap out of it?

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Not only gravity, but drag too.
 
What I always wondered about these kind of rocks: how come they can preserve anything useful (like that germ fossil) apart from some traits of their original chemical composition? If there's a big enough force to throw the rock off the planet, how come the heat probably close to the force not melt the crap out of it?

That is a very good question...
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2. As slicer4 said, volcanoes aren't powerful enough to cause ejecta to escape the gravitational pull of the earth.
 

That was me...

 

Oops.

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Not only gravity, but drag too.

 

What I always wondered about these kind of rocks: how come they can preserve anything useful (like that germ fossil) apart from some traits of their original chemical composition? If there's a big enough force to throw the rock off the planet, how come the heat probably close to the force not melt the crap out of it?

 

The objects are probably a 'reasonable' distance from the strike point of whatever impact caused them to be ejected from the surface which would help.

 

Secondly due to the speeds involved what is likely to happen is the outside is heated quickly but the object then moves away from the source of the heat at speed protecting whatever is inside the object. Think Crème brûlée in rock form :D

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Oops.
 


It's... It's OK.sad.png I understand. He has a better reputation than me.sleep.png Perfectly understandable.

 

biggrin.png tongue.png

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Not only gravity, but drag too.

 

What I always wondered about these kind of rocks: how come they can preserve anything useful (like that germ fossil) apart from some traits of their original chemical composition? If there's a big enough force to throw the rock off the planet, how come the heat probably close to the force not melt the crap out of it?

 

The objects are probably a 'reasonable' distance from the strike point of whatever impact caused them to be ejected from the surface which would help.

 

Secondly due to the speeds involved what is likely to happen is the outside is heated quickly but the object then moves away from the source of the heat at speed protecting whatever is inside the object. Think Crème brûlée in rock form biggrin.png

It's a bit of that, and a bit of an ablation issue. As the surface of the rock gets superheated, it will vaporized and get blown away. The vaporized rock creates a thermal barrier between the solid rock and heat source, drastically reducing the amount of heat the rock receives.

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Not only gravity, but drag too.

What I always wondered about these kind of rocks: how come they can preserve anything useful (like that germ fossil) apart from some traits of their original chemical composition? If there's a big enough force to throw the rock off the planet, how come the heat probably close to the force not melt the crap out of it?

The objects are probably a 'reasonable' distance from the strike point of whatever impact caused them to be ejected from the surface which would help.

Secondly due to the speeds involved what is likely to happen is the outside is heated quickly but the object then moves away from the source of the heat at speed protecting whatever is inside the object. Think Crème brûlée in rock form biggrin.png
Yes, but the object has to speed up first, and for such a speed, wouldn't it has be close to the collision (how I hate English tenses), where things get vaporized?

Maybe it's due to some kind of scourge/lash effect when the rock is torn off from a bigger piece that acted as a heat shield.

+what Capn said

Time to take the English pills... Edited by szecs
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