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Sik_the_hedgehog

Making Blender files take up less space?

5 posts in this topic

Posting here since I figure there are more Blender users in this area.

 

So, I was making a pretty simple model in Blender (just a barebones table without any detail, really). I also decide to export it to the 3DS Max format to show the model to a friend who has that program. OK, fine. Then I look at the filesizes:

 

table.blend = 346,564 bytes

table.3ds = 1,177 bytes

 

Come on? I understand Blender stores some metadata as well as stuff like the current viewpoint (and the exported 3DS file probably lacks it), but what is it doing that the filesize is that big? o_O Sure, it may not seem big, but I don't like wasting space and I plan to make many more models so this will add up quite a bit eventually.

 

Does anybody know if there's a way to get Blender not make the files that big?

 

PS: already disabled thumbnails in files, if that matters (they were showing the model from a completely horrible distance anyway).

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http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Doc:2.6/Manual/Data_System/Files/Save

 

Compress File

Enable this option to squash large files, this removes dead space.

 

How come I didn't see this before is beyond me (guess I completely ignored the side panel). Now the file is 57,177 bytes (somewhat bigger than what I got with xz, but still a pretty large improvement from the 346,564 bytes file). I'd still rather it be less but I guess I can cope with this.

 

Thanks anyway =P

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The difference is what actually gets saved. The 3ds file only saves the model data itself (geometry, materials, etc) while the blender file contains structures explaining the data as well (the so-called DNA structure) that guarantees both forward and backward compatibility. Add to this the workspace setup (tool settings, layouts, preferences, etc), the blender file actually contains far more data.

(To be very specific, the blender file is a direct dump of the internal data structure, while the 3ds is an optimized format to store only very specific data)

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Guys, space is much cheaper now than it used to be.  There is nothing wrong with using the blender's file format for working.  That isn't to say you would use it in the final product, but for production usage it makes sense to use it.

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Hi,

 

 

The only time I use .3ds file is when leaness is so critical to optimization that sacrifices have to be made in some areas to do so, such as some animation editing capability being ditched for optimization.  Most developers aren't even aware of this issue, so naturally most won't see any advantage in using .3ds  Probably the only advantage that I know for .3ds is that leaness when it is critical such as simulations with much content or MMO games with really too much content also.

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