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Serge_GT

The best name for our game.


7 posts in this topic

Hello there, this is an action platform game in a twisted version of our modern world: Irrational buildings, horse-head man and traffic-light-cockroaches firing bullets.

 

The plot is about a bored office guy with a really nasty and tedious job who finds an escape from his routine in a twisted world.

 

We want the most remindable name.
The names we were considering are:

 

- Pestis urbem

- Urbem pest

- Urbem ex pest

 

Untitled-1.jpg

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Are those three choices it? I'll vote for option 4. Names should be memorable and convey some secondary or emotional meaning.


Dish soap gets named things like "Joy" and "Cascade".
Hand soap gets named things like "Dove" and "Irish Spring".
You don't see "poop catchers", you see diaper names like "Luvs" and "Pampers"

When I see "Street Fighter" I get a clear mental image. That mental image is one of gritty fighting and underhanded tricks.
When I see "Medal of Honor" I get a different mental image. That mental image is still fighting, but difficult work on a risky battlefield helping your peers.
When I see "Epic Mickey" I expect something with Disney characters, and some fighting.

When I see those three names you proposed, I get nothing.
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Dude, I'll reiterate: you seriously need to worry more about getting a concrete plot figured out before fussin' over the title. Once the story's finished, then you'll be able to better judge what would be an appropriate title.

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don't use any of those names.No one is gonna use a translator to understand what they mean. And it's also bad marketing,find something else.
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I'm sort of confused by at least some of the replies in this thread. If you know what the words "urban" and "pestilence" mean in English you should have a pretty good idea of what all three of those titles mean (more on that later). I also don't see the problem with giving a game a working title before the game is completely finished; in fact, in my experience it can help crystallize the main idea and actually increase the chances of the game getting finished, at least if there is already a working prototype. I think these titles are clearer than plenty of other examples like, say, "Skyrim" or "Deus Ex," since even if you parse those two, they still tell you nothing about the games themselves.

 

That said, my enthusiasm for the three options presented goes no further than this. Are they supposed to be Latin? If so, why are they in Latin, and why don't any of them use something resembling actual Latin syntax? I mean, the only difference between them are prepositions and endings, and none of them are correct.

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I give my projects obvious "Work in progress" names that convey some of the ideas behind the project. I don't try to come up with a name for the project while it's still in early development.

 

For two years, my project's name was the WIP name "AdventureFar". Cheesy, but descriptive and helps drive the focus of the game. (A friend joked I should subtitle it "The long journey" laugh.png)

 

Finally, a few months ago I was needing to get my game's website online, so I had to come up with the final official name to register the domain. It took one or two weeks to toss around a few ideas and bounce them off family members, and finally when I found the one I liked, it fit so well, and came so much out of the game's style and plot and atmosphere, that I didn't have to think twice about it. The final name I chose was, "Of Stranger Flames", which taking into account everything about the game, makes sense in multiple self-referential ways and is very memorable and easy to hear and understand when spoken aloud, and easy to spell when googling, and doesn't have to compete with much other google results.

 

I say let a temporary name drive and motivate development, and then let development drive the game's real name. When you hit on the real name, hopefully it won't be "creating" a good name, but rather "uncovering" the name that already makes sense from within the game itself.

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I had a hard time trying to figure out how to pronounce them. I have no idea what they mean. Voting for option 4 (Other).

 

Also, I'm digging your graphics smile.png

 

Edit: Alright, I'll give a bit of a break down: I don't like Pestis. Call me immature, but at first glance I thought it said "Penis." I wasn't sure exactly how to pronounce it at first, so I actually had to read each letter and sound it out, which may not be what you want for a name. I don't like "Urbem" either, because I have no idea what it means, I'm not sure I'm saying it right, and it feels "slow" to say (my mouth isn't used to going from "b" to "em"). I'm fine with "ex", so long as it's used in conjunction with other words that make sense to me. "Pest" is okay, but I'm not sure how well "Pest" matches your visuals.

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Edit: Alright, I'll give a bit of a break down: I don't like Pestis. Call me immature, but at first glance I thought it said "Penis."

 

Oh my god, I'm so thankful I'm not the only one.

 

To reiterate other responses: I don't look at those names and think "yeah, that's a game I want to play" or even "that's a game I want to learn more about." Maybe as a subtitle, but not as the game's actual name.

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