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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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hpdvs2

Free Online Game Theory Course from Stanford

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From the info on the site it seems that there are no people who have designed successful games or design games as their full-time job among instructors. So it's difficult to tell if that course has any practical use in game design whatsoever. Edited by WildField
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From the info on the site it seems that there are no people who have designed successful games or design games as their full-time job among instructors. So it's difficult to tell if that course has any practical use in game design whatsoever.

Its a course on mathematics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_theory), not a course on game design (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_studies).

I am surprised they got professors to spend time to shoot videos on what is very very basic mathematics! A proper course on Game Theory should go through (at least a simple version of) the proof, via Brouwer's Fixed Point Theorem, that every finite game has at least one mixed strategy Nash equlibria.

P.S.
Moderators should consider moving this to the lounge as "Game Theory" is not very relevant to game design. The word "Game" in mathematics is often confused with the colloquial meaning. Edited by Legendre
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[quote name='Legendre' timestamp='1357696112' post='5019321']
I am surprised they got professors to spend time to shoot videos on what is very very basic mathematics! A proper course on Game Theory should go through (at least a simple version of) the proof, via Brouwer's Fixed Point Theorem, that every finite game has at least one mixed strategy Nash equlibria.
[/quote]

 

These courses generally aren't intended to be rigorous degree-level courses, and don't lead to a recognised qualification of any kind. They tend to be pitched at the interested, educated lay-person, and cover the material in a way which is usually somewhat light on the mathematics, but deeper than your average Discovery Channel documentary. Alternatively, think of it at the level of a university elective (an introductory-level class you take for semester in a subject outside of your main degree subject). To be fair, the syllabus does at least mention Nash equilibria.

 

I can vouch for the Coursera system - I'm currently taking a course in astronomy, which I have found to be excellent so far. There are a couple of hours of video lectures per week, and well thought out homework questions. It covers the material in some depth, but there is simplification or hand-waving from time to time when maths beyond basic calculus is involved. I think there is a lot of buy-in to Coursera from reputable universities as is allows the lecturer to interact with a large number of "students" at once (I believe some of these courses have subscriber bases on the order of tens of thousands).

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It's a good way to get your feet wet, that's for sure! Sad to say i didn't score very high on the first set of questions. I don't really have the mindset for this degree of statistical analysis as of yet. Then again, it's only week 1 and there are 7 more weeks for me to understand the information. Edited by Reavermyst
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