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hughdesmond2006

Serious Procrastination Problems!

32 posts in this topic

I have that problem ALL THE TIME at school and getting off my lazy rear and doing something with myself (learning c++) does anyone have any suggestions for overcoming this problem

Are you being taught C++? If not you could try an easier to understand language. C++ is harder to understand on your own than a lot of other languages, though I know a lot of people disagree.

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Whenever I feel the urge to procrastinate, I stop and try to push it away.

Maybe take a nap, watch Tiny Toons or MacGyver, or eat.

If the show is over and I still feel some urge to procrastinate I go all-out in my anti-procrastination campaign.  I post on forums, browse the Internet, play piano, go shopping—it’s a full-on anti-procrastination attack.

 

After a few hours my procrastination didn’t know what hit it and I can get back to work.

You just have to learn how to take charge of your procrastination and show it who’s boss.

 

 

L. Spiro

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If you were studing business or science, it would be completely obvious that playing games instead of working on your assignments is a bad idea. I understand where you are coming from with the being exposed idea, but you can probably see alomst everything new in the first 10-15 minutes of the game. You should spend less time looking at the edge, and more time getting closer to it.

 

The people who made those games made them by making them, not playing them.

Edited by TomAAAAA
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For a week this worked pretty well for me:

 

Start coding and once you get bored and notice you can't longer keep going, close your IDE and play Mount & Blade Warband on the hardest settings (except for the "only save on exit" option which is the path to madness).

 

Try to win a tournament with a level 5 (or less) character until you notice you're frustrated enough and can't play any longer, then launch the IDE again and start coding again.

 

Repeat until you die of exhaustion... Or you win the tournament (probably you will die of exhaustion though).

Edited by TheChubu
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If you can afford to, I'd suggest getting a dedicated work machine. Any cheap, probably used, 1-2 year old laptop will be enough for programming, even games, if you are not planning on developing the next CryEngine

Be wary of the requirements of your dev tools. I wanted to develop for WP8 over my vacation, but you need 64 bit W8, and I only had 32 bit W8 on my laptop.

 

While I am totally disgusted by the W8 thing (the only thing dev tools SHOULD require is a text editor and a compiler, these should not have platform restrictions), I agree with the sentiment of be wary of the requirements of your dev tools.

 

But I'm more on the hardware side here: a proper keyboard, mouse, large screen...

Edited by Lode
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What sucks the most is when you finally got urself a free time, after have been working on something (paid work/or any under some pressure work) very hard, realizing how productive you can be if you only sit in front of a computer and program! then you think like "jeez man, look all I have done in only a day, now Imagine what I can do if I start to work on my own games in my hobby projects like that!!"

 

Then you get yourself all the free time you need for some reason...And dont to 1/3 of the shit you do at the job..WHY??

 

I wonder how ppl like John Carmack are in life...I mean, are the difference between ppl like him and average joes the time of procrastination? or is it just the learn speed?

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