• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
3Ddreamer

How Long to Develop Your Last 2D Game - Start to Complete

14 posts in this topic

How long did it take to develop your last 2D game - days, weeks, months - and would you like to describe the game and the process as insight into why it took that long? What type of 2D game was it?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I made this in about two months. It was for a game contest so that helped keep me motivated. It would have likely taken me longer to complete the game if I didn't have the deadline. I started by identifying the basic game play that I wanted to achieve and what I wanted to the game to do. I came up with a list of things my game would have to be capable of doing in order to achieve my goals. I tried to keep things simple so I could finish by the dead line but would still push myself. Then got to work building my game piece by piece. I started with making the graphics engine. Once I got things on the screen I built the collision detection. After that I started working on game logic, then level building. Once I had a basic game working I put more attention into building levels and adding features that the levels needed. Once I had a complete game I spent time polishing up what I could until the deadline.

The deadline determined how much time I spent on my game. If I had more time I could have done more with it. In hindsight I would have liked to put more time into polishing the game. The last 10% of the game takes quite a bit of work.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks cool for two months of work.  smile.png

 

After I clicked the link, I could not get the game to run for me.

 

What file format did you use for the graphic content? How did you render it?  What language(s) did you use for the game?

 

I tried the link again and all I got was a white page with the word "nope" on it.  What is [I]that[/I]?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It didn't get to "complete" because we burned out after 3 months of art production (me) and 2 months of coding (partner, I recruited him after I had already made some art).  At my best estimate we were 1/3 done then, so the whole game would theoretically have taken 9 months.  The game was a flash tycoon-style breeding game with a paperdoll system (mix-n-match-sprites) included.  Comparable to the free games Celebrity Pedigree and Monster Breeding, easy to google those and try them out if you want to know in more detail.  We had the paperdoll system working, though it needed more art assets; the breeding part needed more designwork.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It looks cool for two months of work.  smile.png
 
After I clicked the link, I could not get the game to run for me.
 
What file format did you use for the graphic content? How did you render it?  What language(s) did you use for the game?
 
I tried the link again and all I got was a white page with the word "nope" on it.  What is that?

It doesn't seem to load the first time all the time. I need to fix that problem.

It was an HTML5 game written in javascript. All the images were pngs. Any other data files were custom data formats using json to encode them. If you want to browse the media here is the link. (link) A lot of the json is computer generated so it is hard to read. All of the rendering is done in a 2D HTML5 context in an canvas tag.

EDIT: It works best in google chrome. It works in firefox, safari, and IE 9. Edited by HappyCoder
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I just announced Postmortem: one must die in the other thread, which has been an on-and-off gig I've been working for a few months (by myself) that actually branched out from another failed project from a local artists.

 

At the same time,  I am reusing a big chunk of my legacy fundamental code (i.e. strings, reflection, math, etc.) from even older projects going as far as back as two years ago!

 

I guess when you code and make games for a few years you end up reusing your stuff a lot, and sometimes things branch out like that tongue.png hard to keep track when one project starts and another ends!

Edited by Koobazaur
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EDIT: It works best in google chrome. It works in firefox, safari, and IE 9.

I have the new IE 10, so that must be the cause. Nice stuff you made, hope you keep making games.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EDIT: It works best in google chrome. It works in firefox, safari, and IE 9.

I have the new IE 10, so that must be the cause. Hope you keep making games.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last completed polished game took around 3 months including testing.  Unfortunatly I can quite easily spend just as long or even longer on a game only for it to never see the light of day :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, those who replied so far - approximately how many lines of coding did the game take total?  How many lines of coding for the components such as the interface(s) did you have to make?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last "completed" 2D game project was Egg Hunt.

There's a number of things that remain unpolished however the game is fully playable.

 

Initial idea June 2, 2010.
Work commenced December 14, 2011 ending June 29, 2012.

In that period there were 65 individual days of coding.
I will estimate 2 hours per day for 60 days and 5 hours a day for 5 days = approx 145 hours of work.

 

Don't really know how many lines of code it was that were added by hand to existing code I had or what actually counts as line. But if I concatenate everything together to a single file it comes to about 5000 lines in a 198k file.

Project notes here. (should essentially indicate why it took so long).

Various entries have also been posted to my journal.
The best screenshots I have handy I posted on this journal entry.
Latest build can be found on my website downloads page here.

 

Egg Hunt Quick instructions:

From the main screen:

Start begins the game

Settings allows you to set the size of the maze.

 

Main screen can be used for practice.

 

Search the maze of caverns for 5 eggs and place them in close proximity to each other.

Use arrow keys to move, X to eat things (blocks, flowers, eggs), and Z to spit them back out(except flowers).

Eating flowers affects the character in ways which may be found to help or hinder the search.

 

 


 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Kraken game is about 2000 LoC. I don't actually know how many LoC coding it was, I mean coding for the actual project, because I reused a lot of code from pre4vious projects.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it took me a little over 20 hours over a couple of weeks. it was my very first Graphic-based game a platformer inspired by sonic and mario . It's only one level long, unreleased, and  can be beaten in about 2 minutes but I still consider it one of my biggest game accomplishments ever. it was inspired by a friend from highschool and it is my very first lone game project .  definitely the game i consider my "baby".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0