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KorangarDev

Ready to get started.

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Hello everyone!  Thanks for all your support.  You guys are always so helpful!

Okay so I'm intending on starting a serious hobby-eventual-career of programming games targeting iPhone and Android, the upcoming Ouya, and Browsers.

From what I understand they all can use OpenGLES, right?

 

I want to make 3D games, in LUA, targeting those platforms.

 

I'm looking seriously at Shiva.

 

Originally, I was hoping to use LuaJit and compile to ARM.  Somehow linking OpenGLES in.

My worry is that it's going to be unreasonable to get that working for iOS and browsers.

 

I won't need all the bells and whistles you expect in an engine.

 

I don't need textures, physics, heightmaps, level editors, model imports, audio files.

I do need shaders, meshes, particles, and the ability to control the speakers manually on a very primitive level.

i would prefer having access to multiple platforms, reliable access.

I may or may not need animation lol.  I'm not sure yet.

 

But I don't want to muddy around at too low a level.  I just want to build the systems that the game runs on, not the systems that the systems run on!

 

Thanks guys!

Edited by Blind Radish
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Well, what I'd really like to do, is have access to all the OpenGLES stuff that I need, but in Lua.

I'm digging around for that as we speak.  Not sure


I could target Android, but I don't own one, so i would need an Android emulator or something.

I would target iPhone as I own an iPhone, but I own a PC instead of a Mac.

Besides, Ouya will "run anything that runs on an Android" I guess.  No clue how that works lol.

 

 

So assuming I want to Program 3D games for Android/Ouya in Lua without aforementioned bells and whistles, what tool should I pick?

I'm really unfamiliar with Mobile development but I think it's my best shot at success at this point.

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Other then Shiva, I don't know of any engine that you can use and code in Lua (for mobile). If I was you I'd also take a look at Unity before picking an engine, even though it doesn't use Lua. You can code in either C#, Unityscript or Boo.

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I'm just starting out too on this Tablet development thing too.

In the January sale I came across a cheap(but cheerful) Android tablet(Versus TouchPad 7) for £80. Being a Windows user, I then went to the Android site and downloaded an all-in-one development kit that includes Eclipse...

Coolest thing is that after setting up a USB debugging device, I could hook my Android Tablet up via USB to my laptop and when I run the test application it comes up on the Tablet! Hey, its my first tablet and I'm easily impressed! ^_^

If you are using Windows and want to do it on the cheap, then I recommend you go with Android. If you cant get a device for testing then just use the emulator with the SDK(I assume there is one!) until you save up enough cash for one. Its great for getting started.

Post if you get any troubles. I'll keep my eye on this thread... ^_^ Edited by Anri
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