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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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noatom

No one uses raw directx anymore?

8 posts in this topic

I've been trying for days to find a person with directx knowledge,but it's impossible! Everyone is using unity these days or udk,or cryengine.

Is there anyone left that uses just directx?
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I've been trying for days to find a person with directx knowledge,but it's impossible! Everyone is using unity these days or udk,or cryengine.

Is there anyone left that uses just directx?
Not true at all, on my comp theres at least 6 books on directx which keep getting updated and 4 on HLSL or shaders in general, theres also 2 on COM but they arent really needed for directx, more for understand COM itself

Frank Luna's book will get you through the basics, after that its GPU gems, theres nothing special with directx that needs a lot of books, after a while you realise it becomes more about maths than anything

EDIT: I just realised you said person not books, my bad hahaha, yeh check the DX sub forums ;) Edited by Dynamo_Maestro
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I've been trying for days to find a person with directx knowledge,but it's impossible! Everyone is using unity these days or udk,or cryengine.

Is there anyone left that uses just directx?

weird, their might be some sub-forum, might have the name directX.  might have some people that know things about directX. idk, maybe it's just my imaginary friends telling me lies again.

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I've been trying for days to find a person with directx knowledge,but it's impossible! Everyone is using unity these days or udk,or cryengine.

Is there anyone left that uses just directx?

Most hobby projects will use these because it's a lot easier to use something like unity when you simply want to make a game quickly and efficiently, lets face it without extensive knowledge through reading up on efficient design (and remember to actually write a game rather than focusing on making an engine as per the famous article by jpetrie write games, not engines) and other such things you will very unlikely produce anything that compares to stuff that is already made for you. They also typically provide a way to work on one thing and have it (relatively easily) transfer onto multiple platforms which is an important feature when trying to get as much coverage as you can with your game, while writing native C++ in DirectX will of course not (fairly obviously).

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yes but I mean...If you wanna work for a big company what are you gonna say? I know how to script,but directx beats me? Edited by noatom
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yes but I mean...If you wanna work for a big company what are you gonna say? I know how to script,but directx beats me?

 

In big companies, not everyone deals with the graphics code.

For example, a gameplay programmer would benefit from scripting knowledge, but graphics programming wouldn't greatly benefit this role.

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yes but I mean...If you wanna work for a big company what are you gonna say? I know how to script,but directx beats me?

Well me personally I've done brief work in DirectX 9.0c in my own time about 3 or 4 years ago, plus as part of my computer science degree I'm currently on I'll be using OpenGL next academic year.

 

It's useful to know how to use them but chances are you wont be going straight into graphical programming fresh out of university unless you did a degree in mathematics and joined someone like Nvidia. As I said though hobby projects are almost always best of using something that does a lot of the work for you, and in most jobs you will be working with some form of middleware (even if some of it is developed in house).

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yes but I mean...If you wanna work for a big company what are you gonna say? I know how to script,but directx beats me?

At my last job, I was a "graphics programmer" in the game-engine team, which meant I was pretty much the only guy who used DirectX directly.

It's nice for all game programmers to know how graphics work at the D3D/GL level, but it's only really required if you want to specialize as a graphics programmer.

 

Also, at the job before that one, I was also a graphics programmer (but this time directly attached to a game team, instead of the game-engine team), and I never touched D3D directly - I always used our engine's wrapper around D3D/etc...

Edited by Hodgman
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