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Leikaru

Kingdom Empires - A Game Idea

33 posts in this topic

I have some questions for the OP.

By "300-500 resources", do you mean hundreds of types of resources? How do you define these types? Metals like iron and copper? Lumber like oak and elm? EVE Online actually has a great many resources (likely numbering in the hundreds) for the manufacturing side of its game; that's something you might check out to see how one team put this idea into practice. (I admit that I did not enjoy that aspect of the game, though I tried it for a handful of months, gathering and selling refined resources to make money...not very fun for me personally, but I wanted to try it.)

What will be done with the resources? What is their to build? What will be fun about gathering the resources? What about spending them? How much time do you envision it taking to gather enough resources to manufacture, say, a sword? A horse cart? A manor house? How much time will it take to make those things? Once they are made, what can do they do for you?

How do you envision the gathering of resources taking place? Active gathering, like Minecraft or Terraria? Passive gathering, like SWG or EVE Online?
Yeah, there are different metals, not just "Metal", and "Wood", there is Oak, Birch, Maple, Juniper, Pine, all used for different things. I'll check the thing out, forgotten what it was. Anyway, I'll answer the other questions the best I can.

Resources are used to craft buildings, equipment. All offer different things, eg. Crafting 2000 swords for all of your guards will increase their attack strength. There is much to build, small houses, large houses, flats, Work-stations, Guard-Houses, Factories. Different things take a different amount of time, also, it depends on the amount of builders allocated to the build.

The resource gathering is quite simple. You simply recruit people who want work, and they can gather all the resource for you. Simple as that. Then, once they have full bags, you just get the resources. Simple.

Also, please don't minus my post. Sure, you might think I was being rude, but still, I was making a point, and if you negate this post as well, then I really will be quite annoyed and will lock this thread, and see after a while if the person has become more mature and decided that simply replying isn't a bad thing. Edited by Leikaru
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If you haven't already, I'd recommend giving Dwarf Fortress a try and see what sort of game play behaviors you exhibit if you deny yourself a specific resource. Then think about how similar situations might come up in your game and how you might want to resolve them. It's obviously going to be different from your game idea but it involves a significant number of resources and it sounds like initial stages of resource gathering and structure building might be similar to your game.

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I am still curious as to what the game play is intended to be? You have some number of 'peasants' and you allocate them to gather specific resources; after some amount of time has passed, they gather them and you can allocate some number of 'peasants' to build a thing. Does the gameplay boil down to moving some sliders around and responding to dialog boxes? Interestingly enough, Crusader Kings 2 is very dialog-box driven; there is combat but it's extremely simplistic...more about the consequences of committing resources (soldiers, money, and time) to locations than the combat itself. Something you might consider checking out, insofar as the dialog stuff. (In fact, there are tactical reasons in the game to try and throw people into your dungeon via dialog boxes.)

 

You mention guards; have you considered "levels" for peasants? Maybe the player could elect to spend resources building various training facilities (many games do this, from Starcraft to Civ) that transform a peasant into a specialized unit, or enhance/add to their ability sets.

 

Also, please don't minus my post. Sure, you might think I was being rude, but still, I was making a point, and if you negate this post as well, then I really will be quite annoyed and will lock this thread, and see after a while if the person has become more mature and decided that simply replying isn't a bad thing.

 

To be honest and fair with you, I minus'd that post because it contributed nothing to the conversation; it seemed geared towards picking a fight. When you post an idea on this board, it's an open request for feed back, which is not restricted to praise. People at times will not like your idea or will see potential flaws in it. When they point them out, the idea is to respond constructively. Treat criticism here academically: take it as an attack on the idea and not upon yourself.

 

It's all rather clearly spelled out in the Game Design FAQ for this board.

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Too be honest, you called a part of my game ridiculous. You don't like the game, don't come an post on it. You like the game, but have a few suggestions, post on it. End it there. Not the thread, just this boring argument. Don't boss my game. That's my job.

 

I understand negative reactions towards your idea are not easy to take. 

Please take a second to read my post again though - I didn't just say that I didn't like the idea, I told you why I didn't like it. A good way of taking criticism (at least for me has been) to take that 'why doesn't this person like it?' part and see if you can't use it to improve your idea further. 

serratemplar's post says it pretty well, really.

 

Alternatively, if you don't really think my opinion will be shared by many, or if I don't sound like your target audience then there's no reason to really take it into consideration,

 

I'm really not trying to boss your game, I was trying to be helpful.

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Too be honest, you called a part of my game ridiculous. You don't like the game, don't come an post on it. You like the game, but have a few suggestions, post on it. End it there. Not the thread, just this boring argument. Don't boss my game. That's my job.

I understand negative reactions towards your idea are not easy to take.
Please take a second to read my post again though - I didn't just say that I didn't like the idea, I told you why I didn't like it. A good way of taking criticism (at least for me has been) to take that 'why doesn't this person like it?' part and see if you can't use it to improve your idea further.
serratemplar's post says it pretty well, really.

Alternatively, if you don't really think my opinion will be shared by many, or if I don't sound like your target audience then there's no reason to really take it into consideration,

I'm really not trying to boss your game, I was trying to be helpful.

Not really that helpful is it? Doesn't improve the game situation at all. I was going to release a test version which introduces you to the basic, core features of the game, but really? Should I? People who just want to shout about how bad this game is aren't exactly helpful. They just think they are. That post was rather useless. Yes, this post was too, but still, it's a bit silly to post negative things without backing yourself up with detailed facts about the game. Lots of people that posts those kind of comments are the people that want to see their name in the credits screen once the game is complete. Those people make me laugh hard. Edited by Leikaru
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I am still curious as to what the game play is intended to be? You have some number of 'peasants' and you allocate them to gather specific resources; after some amount of time has passed, they gather them and you can allocate some number of 'peasants' to build a thing. Does the gameplay boil down to moving some sliders around and responding to dialog boxes? Interestingly enough, Crusader Kings 2 is very dialog-box driven; there is combat but it's extremely simplistic...more about the consequences of committing resources (soldiers, money, and time) to locations than the combat itself. Something you might consider checking out, insofar as the dialog stuff. (In fact, there are tactical reasons in the game to try and throw people into your dungeon via dialog boxes.)

You mention guards; have you considered "levels" for peasants? Maybe the player could elect to spend resources building various training facilities (many games do this, from Starcraft to Civ) that transform a peasant into a specialized unit, or enhance/add to their ability sets.



Also, please don't minus my post. Sure, you might think I was being rude, but still, I was making a point, and if you negate this post as well, then I really will be quite annoyed and will lock this thread, and see after a while if the person has become more mature and decided that simply replying isn't a bad thing.

To be honest and fair with you, I minus'd that post because it contributed nothing to the conversation; it seemed geared towards picking a fight. When you post an idea on this board, it's an open request for feed back, which is not restricted to praise. People at times will not like your idea or will see potential flaws in it. When they point them out, the idea is to respond constructively. Treat criticism here academically: take it as an attack on the idea and not upon yourself.

It's all rather clearly spelled out in the Game Design FAQ for this board.
Too be honest, currently them kind of features are not questionable currently, because I have some features that could be asked about a lot.

Yes, Peasants have levels as well.

Posting the fact the you negated my post doesn't really improve the conversation either. Looks like your trying to pick a fight. I have read the FAQ, amazingly, I can read, but some people obviously doubt that. Edited by Leikaru
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Too be honest, currently them kind of features are not questionable currently, because I have some features that could be asked about a lot.
What does that mean? I can't ask you questions about those features, because there are other features that "can be asked about"? Do you mean that features you haven't given thought to are not on the table?
Yes, Peasants have levels as well.
Okay. What do those levels represent? What in-game effect will a higher level have?
Posting the fact the you negated my post doesn't really improve the conversation either.
You did this. You pointed out that I down-voted you, which is what I responded to. It kind of sounds like you're saying "Only I can meta this conversation."
Looks like your trying to pick a fight. I have read the FAQ, amazingly, I can read, but some people obviously doubt that.
Respectfully, had you read the FAQ and taken it to heart, this conversation would not be trending this way. You respond very aggressively to feedback; if that's the case, why did you post here in the first place?
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