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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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pinebanana

Losing interest in game development...

30 posts in this topic

This feeling is normal. Complete something to be proud of yourself, this just happens when you see your projects working.

You are young, don't think you are failling. The great things come with time.

Hopefully.

 

You have to remember that code is never perfect. All code sucks. You can't let that stop you from writing it. This is what programming is.

 

 

Seconded.  As well, I'd like to add my favorite concept, which keeps me motivated (and productive): "First make it work, then you can make it work better."

That first time it works, even if the algorithm is ugly, brute-force garbage, and the framerate is an ungodly 5 fps, is better than se- actually, no, I'd still rather have...anyway: it's an addictive high.  It keeps you motivated, instead of almost completing it 5 times and never seeing anything for your work.

Great advice actually, makes me want to code, plan or something. But... gotta do the homework. 

 

I know I'm leaving half of the stuff out that I could put it in and that annoys me, e.g. texture options (whether to clamp or repeat the texture) or abstracting OpenGL specific stuff (such as Texture classes w/o GLuint directly in them, more data oriented of a design). I REALISE that I could use another engine, like Ogre3D, or whatever, but whenever I do try to use it, I just hate the way that it enforces you to do things their way (plus I find it somewhat awkward programming with someone else's code, unless I've studied it and frameworks like Ogre3d takes awhile to study). But anyway, my game is 2D so I thought why not use OpenGL by itself (probably going to use legacy code because I haven't really learnt about shaders). Another thing, I've made my own entity system, which I know I can really improve but it just gets all out of hand when I try to.
The above indicates that you might be succumbing to the dark side. Don't succumb to the dark side.

Succumbing to the dark side involves slowly losing grip on software projects you are heavily emotionally invested in and leaving them in a constant unfinished state because you are too concerned with how much better your code could have been if only you had made this one decision at the very beginning, or if only you add this one clever feature to your low-level architecture and then refactor your entire codebase to use it.

You have to remember that code is never perfect. All code sucks. You can't let that stop you from writing it. This is what programming is.

Yeah I realise code is never perfect, but I just want to make my code perfect. 

Edited by pinebanana
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Do you have any programming buddies?

 

Actually, EmployeeNumber8 makes an awesome point. I'm noticing that my productivity and motivation stay at much higher average levels from working in a team - I also have a bunch of other gamedevs on twitter and we keep each other on track. You can lone-wolf it if you desire, but you'll be thankful for at least a little bit of a support network. Helps to wave off the depression...

Ah I wish I had a programming buddy. But, I'm currently making a game at the moment and I have an artist (which hopefully wont bail).

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I have an artist (which hopefully wont bail)

Ah yes one of my biggest problems.

 

When I get bored I write DOS games. They may seem like a horrible waste of time being so out of date and all that. However when you write one of them you learn a lot about the hardware you're using and there great fun. You don't have to worry about your code getting to complex because a really complicated program wont run on most dos machines. They are usually quick and almost every line is important and you learn a ton about optimization. So next time you feel like this I would get started on one of those and like me you will wish modern programming was like this.

Edited by ic0de
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We have all experienced feelings such as yours before. At this very moment, I am angered with the level of obfuscation that seems to have arisen in my networking codebase. So, I am removing it. From the ground up. A good point was raised earlier that one should try and refactor wherever possible. Yet, coming at this from the other direction, sometimes it is best to start again. I just purchased a book on software design. Normally, I would not have considered such a step, yet what limits my creativity the most is my constant fear of implementing something the "wrong" way. But, in many cases there isn't a wrong way. Get something working, learn from it, and if needs be redesign it with the newer functionality in mind. The point about a "buddy". I think it is one of, if not the MOST important point.

It's so hard to find someone.

 

 

 

I have an artist (which hopefully wont bail)

Ah yes one of my biggest problems.

 

When I get bored I write DOS games. They may seem like a horrible waste of time being so out of date and all that. However when you write one of them you learn a lot about the hardware you're using and there great fun. You don't have to worry about your code getting to complex because a really complicated program wont run on most dos machines. They are usually quick and almost every line is important and you learn a ton about optimization. So next time you feel like this I would get started on one of those and like me you will wish modern programming was like this.

Well hopefully he wont, but I dunno. Lately I've been frustrated in the way I'm doing things in my current game. I've got all boiler plate code, and a screen showing up currently. Nothing else has been done really. Hopefully I'll have something on the screen by the end of the week.

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