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thesirofsirs1

How would I make an RPG or Turn-Based Strategy

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I'm asking this because I'm not sure how to start with one, I couldn't find anything anywhere that could be of use. What I'm going for is a game similar to the original Final Fantasy (Gameplay Wise), but more simple since I'm only an intermediate. I've made text adventure's and know how to use pygame. Any ideas on how I would do this would be great smile.png

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I'm asking this because I'm not sure how to start with one, I couldn't find anything anywhere that could be of use. What I'm going for is a game similar to the original Final Fantasy (Gameplay Wise), but more simple since I'm only an intermediate. I've made text adventure's and know how to use pygame. Any ideas on how I would do this would be great :)
Check out http://www.pygame.org/tags/adventure for instance.
The posters here supply source code and sometimes explain their projects in detail.

I'd imagine you're more likely to find tutorials for languages such as C++, so you might have to do a little translation (which is good for learning), but I'm not sure where exactly to find these (I suggest searching the forums, as I'm pretty sure I've seen links to them recently).
More likely, sure. But both python.org and pygame.org are full of resources, and in general you can find lots of python tutorials online. Edited by SuperVGA
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When I wrote my first game with pygame (a very simple battle ship game) I read this book first (it is free):

 

http://inventwithpython.com/

 

If you want ideas on design, you probably will need two main "states" on your game. The first one being an in-battle state, at this one you would load a graphical background, the enemies at one side and the players at the other (make it possible to swith positions so you can have a back attack option).

The second state would be the world explore. In this case I would divide the world in a grid, and allow the player to walk one tile at a time (this would  give the game a FF 1 to 5 look) and also make it very easy to avoid entering walls and writting the movement.

 

Finally, as SuperVGA said, you can check the games submited on pygame site, some of them have the source there (here is the link to the RPG part): http://www.pygame.org/tags/rpg

Edited by KnolanCross
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I would like to address this question a bit differently and say that your first step should be a design document on the project concept you wish to accomplish.  What does this have to do with actually coding the game?  Pretty much everything actually.  When you have a complete and detailed design document you start seeing the technical trends and requirements that lead to proper questions that you should be asking of the languages and tools that you should use.

 

From what I gather you are not very experienced with doing the graphics or rendering, in this case it would be wise and highly recommended that you use a premade engine and tool kit and simply script in your logic.  I say this because writing from the ground up using raw hardware level api's such as DX or OpenGL are difficult even for professionals who have experience on multiple projects.  As a beginner who is aimed at making games not making engines and frameworks you shouldn't be over complicating everything trying to learn both at once.

 

With that said and again focusing on creating a design document first you may find that Python may not be an option to you.  For example if your design document (and thus your project concept) is heavily biased on being released on XBox Indie Market you are immediately restricted to an engine that is based on XNA and using the C# language (other compiled languages are forbidden for indies).  If your design calls for very high performance and large particle counts, heavy shading and what not you might want to use a faster engine and said engine may not support Python scripting.

 

Beyond possible limitations and general specs a design document also helps you to determine what you need from an engine or a framework, it will help you to better pick your technologies.  Once you have picked your technologies you can start working through tutorials and asking questions that can be answered directly.  In short, the design document should be the first step of every single game project in my opinion.  For all of the reasons that I just listed and then some, but the point is that the design document will lead you in a specific direction that actually matters to your particular project and gives you a bit of a guideline as to where to go from here and what to do next.

 

For more reading please check out an old journal entry of mine talking about the importance of design documents.  It's not as direct as this post is but it furthermore gives you ideas of why the document is so important and is in general just a good read (at least in my opinion, but I am the guy who wrote it...).

 

http://www.gamedev.net/blog/1003/entry-2250945-who-needs-a-design-document-anyways/

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