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dtg108

Learning C#?

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Hey guys, so I've decided to learn programming, and I want my first language to be C#. I know nothing. No programming terms or anything at all about it, but I know Unity 3D supports C#, so where should I start? Remember, I know nothing, so try not to be too technical. Thanks.

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Yes, I've download visual studio express, and I've known unity's UI for months :D. I don't know programming, but I know Unity's interface well :).

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C# is not a good "first language to learn." You gotta understand that C# is multi-paradigm, meaning that you can program in many different styles (functional, imperative, declarative, object-oriented etc.). By learning different languages like say, Java, C, and Scheme you get a feel for how they work differently from each other. Because C# tries to encompass all these styles, I would imagine it difficult to grasp for a beginner. I don't mean to discourage you though. I'd say just try to teach yourself general programming in a few more common and easier but different languages first.     

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[quote name='dmreichard' timestamp='1358289886' post='5021955']
Suggesting that one learns C++ instead of C# because of C# being multi-paradigm seems even moreso hypocritical, considering that C# confines you more than C++ does in that way.
[/quote]

 

I did not suggest that he learn C++ instead of C#, but rather C. 

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A C program is nondeterministic if you forget to initialize a single variable. This alone is sufficient reason to avoid recommending it as a first programming language.
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A C program is nondeterministic if you forget to initialize a single variable. This alone is sufficient reason to avoid recommending it as a first programming language.

 

 

I think you have your definition of nondeterministic wrong. C is very deterministic. The same thing will happen every time you run your program.

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A C program is nondeterministic if you forget to initialize a single variable. This alone is sufficient reason to avoid recommending it as a first programming language.

 
 
I think you have your definition of nondeterministic wrong. C is very deterministic. The same thing will happen every time you run your program.

No. An uninitialized variable will have whatever value that previously existed in the memory address it gets assigned to. Memory is not initialized beforehand, which is one of the (minor) ways C can produce faster code than languages which initialize everything to zero.

Each time a program starts, memory is effectively random, since it has been altered by other things running on the system. If you don't initialize a variable, it starts with what is effectively random, and this may cause your program to do something TOTALLY different from the last time you ran it.

The value of the uninitialized variable comes from other processes in the same way that a threading race condition can set the value of a variable nondeterministically. A race condition is one of the textbook definitions of nondeterminism in algorithms.

C# is the complete opposite. It initializes all member variables to null/false/zero and produces compiler errors if you try to read from any uninitialized local variables. Edited by Nypyren
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A C program is nondeterministic if you forget to initialize a single variable. This alone is sufficient reason to avoid recommending it as a first programming language.

 
 
I think you have your definition of nondeterministic wrong. C is very deterministic. The same thing will happen every time you run your program.

No. An uninitialized variable will have whatever value that previously existed in the memory address it gets assigned to. Memory is not initialized beforehand, which is one of the (minor) ways C can produce faster code than languages which initialize everything to zero.

Each time a program starts, memory is effectively random, since it has been altered by other things running on the system. If you don't initialize a variable, it starts with what is effectively random, and this may cause your program to do something TOTALLY different from the last time you ran it.

The value of the uninitialized variable comes from other processes in the same way that a threading race condition can set the value of a variable nondeterministically. A race condition is one of the textbook definitions of nondeterminism in algorithms.

C# is the complete opposite. It initializes all member variables to null/false/zero and produces compiler errors if you try to read from any uninitialized local variables.

 

This is true. But in C often your compiler/IDE will give you warnings about uninitialized variables.

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I'm going to stick with C#, for one because Unity supports it and not Python, I plan on sticking with unity :D.

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I'll just throw a recommendation in for the "Illustrated C#" series.  I found them very approachable, moved on to the "Accelerated C#" version and keep that one around for more in-depth reference.  I refer to them as series because there keep being new printings as the language spec continues to grow, but just grab the latest and you should be good.

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OP Check out RBWhitiker's site rbwhitaker.wikidot.com .  it has online written tutorials on c# and xna.  its where i started learning c# and xna.  he also has a book on c# written for beginners as well.  it is advertized on his site.

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