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ApochPiQ

Keyboard rage

16 posts in this topic

Lately I've been wanting to set my keyboard on fire.

I type pretty fast - a natural side effect of having whiled away a lot of hours in front of a computer - but the keyboard I use at work can't cope.

I'm not sure if it's a hardware issue or a software problem, but when I start typing full speed, the keyboard just stops registering about a third of the keys I press. The easiest way to reproduce the problem is to hit Backspace about 10 times as fast as I can; maybe 6 of the hits will actually register on the computer.


Is this because my keyboard is a cheap piece of crap, or is it some kind of OS stupidity? I've fiddled around with all the key repeat/key delay options in Windows to no avail. Haven't checked the BIOS yet but if this gets any worse I'll happily reboot a few times to get it sorted.


TL;DR I'm faster than my keyboard and getting really pissed off at it.
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What type of keyboard is it? Could it be a problem of key reset distance, or limites based on number of "simultaneous" keys pressed?

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I have a cheap $10 keyboard and don't experience this problem - maybe there is some software scanning keypresses for hotkeys in the background, and the software is laggy?

 

Try seeing if there is a better keyboard driver available. Maybe your keyboard has a custom driver, and the driver is poorly written.

Edited by Servant of the Lord
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Is this a keyboard you have had for a long time?  Did it just start happening suddenly or slowly?

You can test whether it is a software issue easily by just borrowing your friend’s keyboard for a day (agree to swap for 1 day with a warning that he or she will be frustrated during that time).

If you have it fine and he or she has it rough you know where to look.

 

If it is a hardware problem, take apart the keyboard and clean it.  Get all of the crap that has built up over time out of there and wipe the rest down with a cleaning spray of your choice.

If that doesn’t fix it then nothing will and it is time for either a new keyboard or a call to MacGyver.

 

 

L. Spiro

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I have this problem on wireless keyboards (programmer's burst typing rate can easily overwhelm wireless keyboard transfer rates).

I had to go back to buying wired ones, on which I've never had the problem.
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Haven't checked the BIOS yet but if this gets any worse I'll happily reboot a few times to get it sorted.

 

This is not going to help because modern OSes completely ignore the BIOS settings at all, they just handle keyboard speed on their own (in fact this is needed in order to be able to set the keyboard speed from within the OS itself). Unless you're running DOS, that is.

 

...wait, is there any BIOS that lets you change the default keyboard speed?

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I have this problem on wireless keyboards (programmer's burst typing rate can easily overwhelm wireless keyboard transfer rates).

I had to go back to buying wired ones, on which I've never had the problem.

 

Wireless keyboards are completely useless for me. I have not found a single one that didn't consistently drop key presses.

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Yeah, I dated myself with the BIOS thing. Back in the day you could control things like keyrepeat suppression via the BIOS. I think one of my relatively less-ancient laptops still allows this.

Updating drivers didn't help noticeably.


I think I might just bring in a known-good keyboard tomorrow and see if it helps...
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Hi,

 

Old or new keyboards work well in old or late model computers - just a fact.  

 

 

1)  Try other keyboards with the same computer:

 If the problem persists with another keyboard then the likely issue is a system driver. If you ever have a keyboard problem like this, then you should immediately plug another keyboard into your rig for testing.  If the problem persists with the next keyboard, then it is not the keyboard, but a hardware device interface driver problem, so your computer needs a driver update or reinstallation. 

 

2) Plug the suspect keyboard into other computers:

A way to see if it is an operating system which is causing this is to take the problem keyboard to the same OS on another computer in the same office and several other OS versions as well. If you have the same problem only with the same OS version, then you know it is the OS at fault.  If the problem continues on varies versions of the OS, then it likely indicates a faulty keyboard driver.  

 

3) Problem only occurs with this keyboard and this computer:

Keyboard manufacturers offer driver updates and sometimes bug-fixes which are worth downloading and applying, but simply plugging the keyboard into several other computers to test it is the quickest way to determine if the problem originates in your computer.   Sometimes an OS update and/or a computer manufacturer update will solve the problem.

 

4) Nothing seems to fix the problem:

  If the problem continues after OS, computer manufacturer, and keyboard manufacturer drivers are downloaded and installed, then the physical keyboard is at fault.

 

 

Clinton

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It's an USB keyboard ? If so, have you attached a new peripheral lately ? AFAIK the usb bus is shared between all attached peripherals so it could be a timing issue between them (just a guess).

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The solution to any keyboard woes is to buy this keyboard: http://www.amazon.com/Logitech-Wireless-Solar-Keyboard-K750/dp/B004MF11MU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1369330691&sr=8-1&keywords=logitech+solar+keyboard

 

I bought one for home. I loved it so much, I bought one on my own dime for work. Now every desk in the office has one. It's wireless, and I've never had a single hiccup, even with dozens of closeby identical wireless keyboards. And no batteries to replace, since it charges based on ambient light much faster than it uses power. The key action is nice, with a good tactile click, but it isn't too loud. It's got a full number pad, and the insert/home/delete/etc. keys are all in the correct layout. On longevity, I'm not sure, but I type all day at work on one that's now about two years old, and it shows no signs of wear except that the keys I use most (especially spacebar) are completely smooth now (they come very mildly textured). There's even a Mac layout version, if you're into that.

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