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lalabahh

Game Idea, Please read

7 posts in this topic

That was a very brief description in a very saturated genre, do you have an idea of what will make game different, unique or special? That would be a lot easier to discuss.
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What makes games unique, different, or special is...well, anything. That description seemed like a typical Western RPG BUT in a sandbox format with a focus on survival for the first few hours of gameplay, emphasis on choice. 

 

The only problem is that game seemed to be like Skyrim and Oblivion but with no purpose other then to let loose in a medieval virtual world. Personally, it's a bit of a downgrade.

 

What makes games unique, different, or special is...well, anything. = The art style of a game could make a game unique (Angry Birds)

 

The mechanics of a game could make it unique, the story of the game could make it unique, the setting of a game could make it unique, the music, voice actors, tone, themes, etc, etc. 

 

If a game doesn't feel different, unique, or special, that means it's too static (unchanging) with the standard of the genre and doesn't do anything unique. 

 

Even remarkably bad games are unique and different(Just not any good) 

 
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I apologise I didn't mean to seem hostile or dismissive, I meant that I would find it much easier (for me at least) to discuss aspects of the game concept that make it different from Skyrim or Oblivion, because as I was reading the post, those games are what I was imagining. 

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Hey now guys, sometimes the same isn't all that bad. Alot of top end developers out there take from other huge games from time to time. I'm sure that given time to review his progress on the thought that it'll shape into something more than a skyrim clone. angry birds is in a genre thats been around for ages, they just marketed the game at a good time. Look at all the GTA's its the same game in a different city. Every year we get a new sports game of every sport. Dare i say that a number of the FPS games that have been coming out are all starting to blur into the same game.

 

The security of it is; a person might make a game thats a clone of another because he knows that it's already popular, where as a unique idea may or may not flop and he doesnt like risk. Either that or he really wants to see more games in the same genre and wants to learn to take up the mantle himself.

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Heheh okay, I guess I worded my first comment badly. Never mind.

I like the idea of not just your character having a hunger system, but every NPC having a hunger system, so a poor village with little food will have more crime and violence than a plentiful town. Is that what you meant?

About the player's own hunger system, I think that would have to be very carefully balanced. The most important thing would be what happens when the character's hunger reaches maximum? Will they-
Die perminantly
Die and respawn somewhere
Lose exp or some other value
Just be less effective in combat
Just make the screen all messed up like games that have an 'insanity meter'
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What if it's crazy debilitating, like attribute damage and THEN if certain attributes hit 0 then its like a permenent death/reload last save. Then if the game sees that you keep dieing from hunger it could ask you if you want to adjust the hunger setting. That way you don't lose a save 'cause you forgot your steak at home.

 

Various physical skills could exhaust more hunger, or if its there is a magic system that could drain a bit to. Kinda like it's physically taxing to cast spells. Just spitballing now :p

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Please see this on Game Design page, accidental post on this page http://www.gamedev.net/topic/637447-medieval-rpg-ideas/

 

I'm confused. This is the Writing forum, and the point of this thread in Writing is "go look at my thread in Game Design"?  This discussion doesn't belong here, and I really don't get this "the purpose of this thread is to get people to read my other thread" thing. Closing.  People can discuss the game idea in the Game Design forum.  This is essentially crossposting.

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