• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
TTT_Dutch

High School Student with High Goals -- Need Advice

27 posts in this topic

Well excitement out of your game will come will come as soon you're able to consider it a game. Basically if you're making a game designing mechanics and systems won't be comparably entertaining as the game itself when you've set up your mind for a game. A quick "fix" for that is rewarding yourself with fragments of the game as soon as possible. Get to the playable part ASAP even with close to no gameplay at all. visually seeing the results and being able to play around with them helps A LOT! I suggest you to see the Brett Victor talk "Inventing on principle". PS : I can't currently provide you with links as I'm writing from my phone. Sorry about that.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well excitement out of your game will come will come as soon you're able to consider it a game. Basically if you're making a game designing mechanics and systems won't be comparably entertaining as the game itself when you've set up your mind for a game. A quick "fix" for that is rewarding yourself with fragments of the game as soon as possible. Get to the playable part ASAP even with close to no gameplay at all. visually seeing the results and being able to play around with them helps A LOT! I suggest you to see the Brett Victor talk "Inventing on principle". PS : I can't currently provide you with links as I'm writing from my phone. Sorry about that.

Well I have the tile renderer working and I can load randomly generated map into the game. Does that count? Haha biggrin.png

 

Also I have gotten trello up and running (asana alternative). I really like it and hopefully it will allow me to manage my time better. I also have been looking into the pomodoro technique, have a timer on my phone for it! And the RPG concept looks cool for the HabitRPG site, but it doesn't quite look ready for full use yet.

 

Also I like trello and promodoro because I can use it on my phone while keeping my internet off so that I can use the 25 minutes (might raise to 30) to code without distractions.

Edited by Riztro
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Priorities your goals, if the game you are making is not on the top of the agenda it is going to take a long time to make and little work is going to be done ( a sloppy job) .
I started out looking for people with common interests and knowledge, happily two of my high-school friends shared the same passion for game making and such material.
Personally, I think more people gives you more of a shot of getting the project done, when somebody gets "issues" the rest of us keep on working and persuading the issued one to work as well. Its quicker and everyone can learn an aspect of the development process better then the others, thus working more efficiently and making swift
progress.
And it used to be a lot harder back when i was working alone, when you lose motivation or cant solve a problem you just stop all progress and it takes ages for you to go on further. So essentially a good team makes everything possible, if you have that then you are on the right path.

PS: When you get into it, you just cant stop. smile.png


[twitter]BusyBeePixUnit[/twitter]

http://www.pixunit.com Edited by PixUnit
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0