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Main differences between Unity and UDK?

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Greetings, i'd like to know the main features and differences between unity and udk engines.

I've read their descriptions but i don't really know how should i choose between one or the other.

Is there a main difference or should i try both and choose based in the experience?

 

Also have someone already done this?

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[quote name='Daaark' timestamp='1358878192' post='5024375']
People severely overstate the missing features in the free Unity.[/quote]

Aye, that's a fair point. I'm building the entire game world via GPGPU procedural generation, so the lack of render-to-texture is a non-starter for me. YMMV.

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Lack of RTT hurts me a bit too. I want to render something onto the screen of an arcade machine, but I will have to do without for now. It's just a background detail anyways, and doesn't effect my game one way or the other. I'll use a UV coords hack to atlas some frames and get around it.

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it is worth considering that the licensing terms/costs are drastically different:

 

Unity has a free indie license, but the feature set is significantly crippled - my impression is that most serious developers will be looking at a commercial license instead. A commercial unity license costs $1,500 per developer (plus $400 for each of iOS and Android publishing, if you need those), but you never have to pay any royalties.

 

The UDK requires a $100 publication license when you are preparing to ship your product, but also charges 25% royalties on any revenue after the first $50,000.

 

This presents you with an interesting cost equation. Unity's per-seat licenses are expensive upfront, but after that you never need to pay a dime. The UDK costs pretty much nothing upfront, but if your game produces a high revenue, you will be paying a fair bit of money out in royalties. My back-of-the-envelope calculation suggests that the UDK might be more cost effective for a game that grosses under ~$120,000, and Unity is significantly more cost effective for a game that exceeds that figure - but you should run your own projections to validate the choice for your particular situation.

 

One other hard fact is that you will have to shed a huge amount of cash out if you need to change something in the source codes as well. I guess options like Ogre and Torque could be worth considering as well. In fact this link could help out also: free engines

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A lot of those engines on that list aren't that good, or severely limited.

Ogre is just a rendering engine. Nothing wrong with that, it does it's job very well. But that's an apples to oranges comparison. It's not a game engine.

Irrilict was a mess. Nothing worked very well. Basically made by a group of guys who just copied everything Quake2 did. Anytime you see an engine, and all the supported functionality revolves around what quake did, and quake file formats AVOID AT ALL COSTS! Forum is full of 'tard know-it-all, OSS zealots, who can't help you with anything when it comes to making games.

GTKRadiant (which is on the list) is not a good editor in 2013. I say this as someone who used to live in various flavors of Radiant for years and years. Unless you are modifying old ID games, it won't do anything for you. It's not 1996, we can model with real polygons now, and not have to be limited to using an outdated brush system, and a unneeded power of 2 coordinate system. Brushes are abstractions over polygons, and you can't even drag a vertex without the editor modifying the rest of the brush to maintain a legal shape. Unless you are making a corridor shooter made out of very coarse and simple shapes, it will fail you miserably.

Panda3D is awesome if you are using Python. It advertises C++ compatibility, but when I tried it years ago, there wasn't any C++ documentation, and they didn't make it very easy to use it.

Blender's built in game engine is good for Python too. Just model stuff, add some logic blocks, and start the game engine to watch it all in action. Very good for prototyping ideas.

The rest of that stuff is not worth anyone's time. It's all just someone's hobby project. They don't have good support, or knowledgeable user bases. Unity and UDK have tons of KNOWLEDGEABLE people making cool stuff to get help and inspiration from. With Unity at least, you can just google "Unity3D <Whatever problem you are having>" and get a ton of results from their forums and answers site, and wiki.

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