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brain28

Advice need for business plan

8 posts in this topic

I am making a business plan
for the creation of a game development company. I made some research on the
subject along time now and have my results, but there some thinks i am not
fully aware of and would love for some advice.



 

If i plan to have 2 million users on an online game (like L.O.L) what kind of servers should i need to use and how many

of them? (So i can put the costs of buying the machines on the plan)

 

I know that the server capacity is defined on active client connections per instance and also we have the network limitations but i am not that good on math. tongue.png



 

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I know i will not get 2 million users right away but in my plan that is my base target. So is best to include the servers for supporting this number of people or not?

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Dan thank you for the info and i am aware of the reality on the game industry. I think a professional realistic business plan should draw investors attention, but then again i agree on the fast profit scenario. Is all about how you sell your self to others.

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The architecture of your game is going to determine the CCU that your servers can support. Even so, this is a theoretical measure, as high concurrence could lead to unwanted and erratic behaviors.

Hosting is a very interesting topic, but I too would recommend that you get someone that understand it to hop aboard your venture before going any further. You can't just assume it will "all work out" and take X amount of servers for Y amount of users. It is much more complex.

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In my experience, unless you have a significant demo-able product already, a significant population interested in your progress or a strong history in profitable games, no investor will touch your idea.  Unless you already have one of those things or more, you might want to skip the Business Plan, and focus on marketing for Crowd Funding sites. More investors are interested in hopping on board an already successful operation, than an idea.  For instance, start your game small, and start taking in some kind of revenue, however small.  Then add one or two features, and track how the finances increase with that.  Then present that information to potential investors with an idea showing how the next feature needs some additional capital to create, and based on the history of the game will introduce X percentage increase to profits/customer count.  

 

Investors tend to be experienced enough to recognize the difference between projections based on facts and projects based on guesses.  especially with the financial climate the way it is, you'll be hard pressed to get any investor on guesses.  

 

Crowd funding is very different.  Typically, you establish goal levels, I.e. at 10,000 the game development will begin.  at 50,000, we will contract out to highly professional artists.  at 100k, we blah blah blah.  then offer things like getting a good feeling about helping the product by giving 5$, getting a free online membership for the first year, for 15, (anticipating 20/year cost), and 100$ for unlimited life time on the server, etc...  Check out whats already out there, what worked and what didn't.

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In regards to your starting question, Server prices also depend on what your system will need.

 

I.e. 1x 2ghz 4gram dedicated box with 200g space might go for 40$/mo, including 20G transfer a month free.

 

But the engine you use may greatly change the need for this.  For instance Hero Engine is run in their own cloud, and a development license is 100 for one developer/designer, and 500 for a team of up to 25.  Its fully featured, produced lots of great games, easy to work with, and best, is as long as your pulling in anything from customers, the server usage/expansion is all covered, and already built in.  You could just consider that you need a 500$ investment to begin with plus any other operating costs for local usage/team needs, and your good to go.

 

Seriously, check out HeroEngine.  There are other services like this, but they are the best I've seen.  http://www.heroengine.com

 

Crowdfunding this should be pretty easy, since its a low investment.  If you can't come up with that yourselves.

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If i plan to have 2 million users on an online game (like L.O.L) what kind of servers should i need to use and how many

of them? (So i can put the costs of buying the machines on the plan)

 

I know that the server capacity is defined on active client connections per instance and also we have the network limitations but i am not that good on math. tongue.png



Here is your chance of to start doing math. No one else can estimete for your.

My question: is a gamer downloads 1 mb or 10 mb just to start the game?

As you can see in both cases ... different servers will be needed.

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