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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Bakuda

Attending GDC

9 posts in this topic

So...I've decided to take the plunge and attend GDC this year.  I have business that'll put me in the area so it works out very conveniently.  However, at the moment I can only afford to purchase the Expo Pass.  Being that this is rather limiting, I'm wonder what opportunities I'll have to network and, more importantly, learn and grow.  Also, with just the Expo pass is it worth it to attend the whole Wed-Fri or just one or two days?  Again, thanks to all of you for your help and expertise.  I'm jumping into this career with a love of music and games and minimal knowledge on the business side, learning everything as I go along.  Your help here has been invaluable!

 

 I also just want to add that I've posted this in this section because I'm attending as a composer, and am looking for advise from the perspective of a composer.

Edited by Bakuda
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The expo pass only is good for getting your face and resume in front of hiring managers and company reps. The only problem is you're in music and it's very hard to land gigs in a loud, crowded room where only your resume (and not your audio) represents you. (Edit - many of the larger companies have lines of people wanting to drop off resumes and you'll only get a few minutes with the company rep... just trying to paint a realistic picture of what you'll be facing). It's possible to land work in the expo room but you're going to have to really be unique, to stand out from the thousands of people there, and try and get a bit more time with the person.

 

I still think it's worth it to go and get a feel for what GDC is like, even just at the expo level! This is especially true if you're already going to be near it so some of your costs are covered. Then the following year you can go out on an audio pass (or something similar) to where you can actually attend talks, classes and do much more learning. GDC is a great event and I'm going back for my 3rd San Fran and have been to 3 Austin GDC events (back when they had an audio track).

 

I could usually walk the expo floor within one day, maybe two so since that's the only kind of pass you'd have - I wouldn't stay longer than 1-2 days. I don't recall, off the top of my head, if the expo pass gets you into any parties where major networking and hanging happens.

Edited by nsmadsen
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The expo pass gets you into the game career seminar, GDC Play, IGF Pavilion, expo floor, career pavilion, business center,and the IGF and choice awards.  Plus the mobile app and happy hour =D.  Any of these more worth seeing then others?

Edited by Bakuda
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The expo pass gets you into the game career seminar, GDC Play, IGF Pavilion, expo floor, career pavilion, business center,and the IGF and choice awards.  Plus the mobile app and happy hour =D.

 

I see that, now, not to mention the much cheaper price. Thanks for letting me know. XD

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If you can swing it, see if you can get an Audio Pass.  Yes, I realize it's quite a bit pricier (though there is a modest GANG discount if you're in GANG).

 

But folks I've talked to who have attended on an expo pass said they felt a bit like a kid, nose pressed against the candy store window, watching their friends load up on Tootsie rolls and candy bars.

 

Note that if you do have an expo pass, there are a couple 'audio' things you can still get into that aren't well documented"  The GANG town hall meeting, the ia-sig Town Hall meeting and the GANG awards show.

 

Brian Schmidt

GameSoundCon

Brian Schmidt Studios.

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Actually...my San Francisco trip isn't panning out after all.  At first I was going to just make the trip anyway, but then decided just to forget it this year.  I'm just not sure it would be worth the trip to be one of those kids in that huge candy store (why do I all of a sudden feel like Charlie Bucket?).  I have the feeling that next year I'll be more prepared as well as more able to afford the audio pass.  

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Actually...my San Francisco trip isn't panning out after all.  At first I was going to just make the trip anyway, but then decided just to forget it this year.  I'm just not sure it would be worth the trip to be one of those kids in that huge candy store (why do I all of a sudden feel like Charlie Bucket?).  I have the feeling that next year I'll be more prepared as well as more able to afford the audio pass.  


You and me both, combined with being a student at the moment, in my case. Besides, I'm proving to be more interested in what Schmidt is in charge of: GameSoundCon, since it's meant to emphasize the music and other audio in games.
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I'm proving to be more interested in what Schmidt is in charge of: GameSoundCon

 

There really is no substitute for GDC.  That is the premiere event for anyone working on games.  It's 18,000 people, nearly all of whom are involved in making games!  

 

Now,  GDC  is most definitely geared primarily to those who have done a lot of work in games or are very knowledgeable about it.    It presumes a hefty base of knowledge on how games work, and a lot of people who go with a background only in 'traditional' music/sound design get kind of flummoxed by a lot of the sessions and terms that get thrown around  ("Streams", "RTPCs", "Middleware", "interactive mixing", etc.), so if you don't know what those are and what they mean, it's easy to get lost.  Even the "audio bootcamp" at GDC presumes a decent amount of game audio knowledge.

 

GameSoundCon is great for getting that base knowledge needed to understand how games differ from other types of music for media (film, TV, music production, etc.).  I've had many many GameSoundCon attendees who later went to GDC tell me that GameSoundCon really prepared them for GDC and gave them context and information to be able to understand what everyone was actually talking about.

 

If you're new to games or maybe have done a few small iPhone/facebook games and would like to "up your game" to the next level, I'd probably suggest GameSoundCon, followed by GDC.  If you can really only go to one, I'd probably suggest GDC (As the creator of GameSoundCon, I probably shouldn't say that! blink.png).  But everyone should experience GDC at least once :)

 

Brian Schmidt

Executive Director GameSoundCon

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You don't have any info up for GSC 2013 yet...any idea when that info will be available???

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