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ISDCaptain01

I think the required Humanities courses in college are a waste of time

76 posts in this topic

Oh, so he disagrees with your opinion on education, and therefore does not deserve one? And you're supposed to have a Philosophy degree? You're a joke. I'm honestly stunned that this is how the community on this site is. Honestly. And I hope that last sentence about Computer Science drones was a joke. I pray it was. I'll assume it was.

I appreciate that sarcasm can occasionally be a little hard to recognise over the internet, but I couldn't have been a lot more obviously sarcastic if I tried...

 

That said, there is more than a grain of truth to what I said:

  • If you don't want to deal with the humanities, then don't get a liberal arts education - there are plenty of trade schools that will be happy to feed you a steady diet of 1s and 0s, and the qualification you end up with isn't all that different (provided you actually want a pure tech job).
  • I encounter a fair number of people who can program rings around me, and yet are unemployable due to their lack of ability to hold a conversation outside of technical fields. Perhaps it's disingenuous of me to suggest that a lack of knowledge outside their field is to blame, but it certainly doesn't help.
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I found it helpful to try to relate every class to game development somehow, to make them more interesting. In the case of art history, that is not even a stretch! It is useful for picking an art style for a game, or at least being literate enough to work with artists effectively, and generally helps build awareness of the context in which players live their lives. A lot of visually distinctive games get their look from picking unusual art styles that you might learn about in art history, like Braid, Bioshock, Okami, Journey, and Incredipede.

 

Since you have no choice in the matter, you might as well make the best of it, and to do that you need to find something in the class that can hold your interest. Otherwise it really is a waste of time and money!

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And I hope that last sentence about Computer Science drones was a joke. I pray it was. I'll assume it was.

Actually, I'd say that there's some truth to it. It applies to more than just computer science, too. If all you can talk about is your field, then the only people who will want to talk to you will be in your field and (by definition) the only conversation you'll get will be related to your field. If all you can talk about is your field, I can guarantee that other people will have a lot of difficulty relating to you. Some people might prefer this state of being, of course. I know very few people for whom that is the case. I know even fewer people for whom the idea of socially interacting with such "drones" is a palatable one.

How about instead of classifying his post, disrespecting him, and tossing it to the side, you offer an opinion that's actually of some worth?

Perhaps you've noticed that pointing out problems with another person's ideas is not considered disrespectful here. Perhaps you've noticed that this is a technical forum. Perhaps you've noticed that the entire purpose of (most) technical forums revolves around pointing out problems with other people's ideas in order to help them. This is not a place where we pat each other on the back just for having an opinion. If you post an opinion here, you should expect that someone will eventually point out a problem with your opinion. That's what we do.

Personally, I'm of the opinion that posts that seem like teenage-level whining should be called out as such, so I don't blame people for doing just that if they make such a judgement. I'm sure many of us have had similar feelings to those OP expresses. I'm likewise sure that most of said people have had those feelings called out as detrimental to one's personal growth by our elders, our peers, or even those more junior than us. Personally, I welcome such calling out as useful to clarifying my own self-perception. I would rather have the entire internet tell me that my way of thinking is unhelpful - and therefore be aware of the fact and able to contemplate how to correct it - than remain unaware and potentially fuck myself over later in life.

Anyone who sits behind their keyboard and says stuff like "Well if you don't like college, don't go" is sucking on some strong alcohol.

Not really. College is not yet a mandatory aspect of one's education. It is also the case that not everyone has the mindset to both succeed in and enjoy college/university. Furthermore, For all activities (and college is no different), one may ask the following question: if you don't enjoy what you're doing, cannot deduce that what you're doing is good for you, and it isn't mandatory, then why are you doing it?

The kid has a right to complain about stuff he doesn't like.

And we have just as much of a right to point out that his complaints are both futile and based on a mindset which is unlikely to be helpful to him. ;)

If you had the same opinion he did when you were his age, why are you doing exactly what everyone else did to you?

I did, and therefore I can say something about the matter, and I say this: we do this because we have come to perceive what "everyone else did to us" was good for us. You make it sound like pointing out that a mindset is unhelpful to one's personal growth is some form of bullying or torture. Where did you get such an idea?

Why don't you relate with him and help him with your experience,

It looks to me like that's what's been happening in this thread.

Maybe because then you wouldn't have the fun job of just piling on a guy, post after post, joining the horde of "You don't know anything, young blood. You just so stupid and young and oooh."

I'm no longer certain that you and I are reading the same thread. Edited by Oberon_Command
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Oh, so he disagrees with your opinion on education, and therefore does not deserve one? And you're supposed to have a Philosophy degree? You're a joke. I'm honestly stunned that this is how the community on this site is. Honestly. And I hope that last sentence about Computer Science drones was a joke. I pray it was. I'll assume it was.

I appreciate that sarcasm can occasionally be a little hard to recognise over the internet, but I couldn't have been a lot more obviously sarcastic if I tried...

 

That said, there is more than a grain of truth to what I said:

  • If you don't want to deal with the humanities, then don't get a liberal arts education - there are plenty of trade schools that will be happy to feed you a steady diet of 1s and 0s, and the qualification you end up with isn't all that different (provided you actually want a pure tech job).
  • I encounter a fair number of people who can program rings around me, and yet are unemployable due to their lack of ability to hold a conversation outside of technical fields. Perhaps it's disingenuous of me to suggest that a lack of knowledge outside their field is to blame, but it certainly doesn't help.

I dunno, I understand that personality and appearance are often worth quite a lot more than any actual skill, although you only really need a certain baseline before technical ability kicks in, but if all these people complaining about the poor social skills of some people, one would think they could use THEIR apparently masterful social skills to work around the kinks and get the most out of the people with limited social skills. Perhaps they should have the same requirement of thinking outside their own world view. The double standards applied to smart people annoy me quite a bit even though I actually do have social skills and can talk about a wide variety of topics with at least slightly above average knowledge.

 

I've always gotten on okay with people obsessed with their one technical field, and I'm not even making money off those skills. I find it takes only a slight bending of the mind to get along with them. So I've never understood why in a work environment where those people could be worth a lot of money, their bosses/coworkers cannot achieve the same result. I've occasionally gotten in trouble in my volunteering, since until recently I had no desire to have a job, for not being "professional" enough. And yet those same people get mad at the people who are paradoxically TOO FOCUSED on the work. It's all quite confusing.

 

I've noticed that the average joe has problems even taking in my world view, which in most cases is far closer to theirs than that of the super focused somewhat anti social super brilliant person, yet they never cease to complain that even the only mildly differently minded people never seem capable of looking at the world from another point of view, which is basically code for their own world view.

 

From my dabbling in social justice and gifted learning I am pretty sure that the people on the outside of the average/majority/dominant culture are FAR more aware that other people have different points of view that people on the inside. Having had to butt up against the majority world view their whole lives while people on the inside can totally ignore the differing views of others since outsiders have no power due to their low numbers.

 

I can see having problems with low functioning autistic people maybe, but not moderately or highly functioning ones, and the same for other non neurotypical conditions. But how many of those managed to get a degree really? Or are you referring to hobbyists who can program rings around you?

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Games are not created in a vacuum. You need to pull inspiration from places, communicate with other people, and learn techniques from other disciplines. Taking these humanities courses are VITAL to expanding your non-specific skills. Your team members are going to ask for feedback from YOU.

 

-Your artist is going to produce compositions and ask for your response. If you took a brief course in art history were they had you analyze art from a specific time period that will help you! You will know what terminology to use and what to look for.

 

-You game designer is going to ask for feedback on a feature he is thinking about. If you took a class in psych or communications you can explain why this feature would work or not. You can even expand on that feature and improve it with your own ideas.

 

-Your audio guys is going to need help getting the game to sound just right. If you took a brief music intro class you could tell him it needs a little darker tone, maybe use a minor key. Or point him to composers/songwriters you remember from that class that had a style that would fit.

 

You need all these skills to better interweave with your team members. Working together means you are going to need to go a little cross discipline. Absorb as much information as you can!!!

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I dunno, I understand that personality and appearance are often worth quite a lot more than any actual skill, although you only really need a certain baseline before technical ability kicks in, but if all these people complaining about the poor social skills of some people, one would think they could use THEIR apparently masterful social skills to work around the kinks and get the most out of the people with limited social skills.

They could. But why would they?

People like working with people with whom they feel comfortable. The reality is that people with poor social skills have a tendency to make others (including those who also have poor social skills) uncomfortable. One party having good social skills cannot always make up for the other party having exceedingly poor social skills. So, why would someone with good social skills put up with someone who has poor social skills when individuals with both technical and social ability exist and are (more than likely) available to them, and can do the same job? Edited by Oberon_Command
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This is an interesting topic. When I went to university, the science/engineering students did engineering/science courses and the humanities students did humanities courses and ne'er the twain shall meet. 

 

Thinking back now, I would have hated to have to sit an English lit. course. On a purely practical level, I never enjoyed writing papers on literature. I enjoyed reading, and even discussing themes etc, but I would have hated to be tested on it, because I know it would have dragged my grades down.

 

These days, I can appreciate the value in a broader education. I spend a lot of my time reading and learning about non-cs subjects (currently reading "The Better Angels of Our Nature" by Stephen Pinker, highly recommend it). But while I enjoy this, I'm still pretty sure I'd hate to have to sit down and write an essay on it.

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So just because I dont like to take huminities class means I have poor social skills. How did you guys come to this conclusion?

Excuse me, but I DO have friends that are not CS majors and I talk about a wide variety of topics other then technical talk. I am aware of the current world affairs and what is going on, but I dont think i needed to waste my time in a political science class or history class. I mean I have been taking these classes since elementary school, I think I know by now.

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So just because I dont like to take huminities class means I have poor social skills. How did you guys come to this conclusion?

If you actually read the thread, you'll see that nobody is making that connection. We're talking about being able to carry on a conversation outside one's own field, the lack of ability of which can come across as a lack of social skills. Since merely coming across as lacking social skills general subjects one to the negative impacts of that problem, it's related to the discussion, but the conclusion you think we're making isn't the one being made.

Excuse me, but I DO have friends that are not CS majors and I talk about a wide variety of topics other then technical talk.

Then you are not a "computer science drone" of the sort we're discussing.

I am aware of the current world affairs and what is going on, but I dont think i needed to waste my time in a political science class or history class. I mean I have been taking these classes since elementary school, I think I know by now.

Well, alright, fair enough; you've been exposed to those fields already. So what about something else, like the film studies course I mentioned? Did you study film before college? How about archaeology or ethics, or any other subject that no school covers pre-college? I took a fascinating course in ancient "near Eastern" archaeology when I was in 3rd year. I learned loads of interesting stuff about the ancient Egyptians, Sumerians, Akkadians, etc. I could never have taken that in middle or high school - there was nobody who could have taught such a class. I feel like you're focussing too much on the stuff you don't like, and are completely ignoring the stuff that you've never encountered, which you therefore cannot judge uninteresting. Edited by Oberon_Command
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I must say that I find the very rude comments about the OP here in the thread rather uncivilized and unmature. That also goes for one of the moderators here. No person should be called a child just because he dares to be critical of how a CS program is put together by an institute.

 

How about explaining more about what the non CS courses could be used for in the game dev business? How about more argumentation and less insulting?

 

Remember that bad communication skills will damage this site's reputation if not taken care of in time. Just my two bits(I do not like cents biggrin.png ).

Edited by Dwarf King
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If your college is re-hashing stuff that you learned in elementary school, maybe you need to find a better college altogether?

 

At the end of the day your complaints don't matter, least of all on an internet forum. If you don't fulfill the requirements of your program, then you don't get your degree. To paraphrase a certain infamous Secretary of Defense, you come into college with known-unknowns--you know that you need to learn about computer science--and there are unknown-unknowns--things that your lack of life experience leads you to believe are unnecessary and wasteful, but which people who are probably smarter than you or I believe are beneficial, if not necessary. As myself and others have pointed out, you'll need to interact with people from different backgrounds in your work life, and if you're interested in games, many of those people will be artists.

 

In other terms, I can personally attest that the difference between having a 'Eureka!' moment and passing by blissfully unaware, is often having that different perspective or some little piece of 'useless' information at hand which allows you to draw a dotted line between seemingly unrelated things. These moments will stand out in your work life, they keep you  employed, they get you noticed, and they help get you promoted.

 

Furthermore, it becomes really, really hard to advance in your work life by being good at just one thing -- even, really, really good -- because there's bound to be many people with an essentially identical skill set. In my work as a technical writer for a large software company, I pull down a rather good living because I'm both a pretty decent programmer and a pretty decent writer -- I earn around the same as a programmer of like experience, maybe a bit more, even, and I don't have to deal with all the bullshit that job entails and I almost never work more than 40 hours per week (typical programmer here? 50-60 I'd guess.) My gaming background further allows me pick out areas that are interesting for me to work on -- stuff that relates to graphics, gaming, low-level coding. Right now I'm working on something really cool that I wish I could talk about, but can't. In another job I once interviewed for, the ideal candidate would have an astronomy background and it payed very well (about 2x my previous gig). You just never know what the job market is going to throw at you.

 

My point is that you'll always do best when you're ripe for opportunity; you do need deep technical skills, but broad, far-flung skills also come up far more frequently than you might expect.

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 That also goes for one of the moderators here. No person should be called a child just because he dare to be critical of how a CS program is put together by an institute.

 

Feel free to name me, I know what I wrote :)

 

More to the point I didn't say he WAS a child I said he sounded LIKE a child because he wasn't being critical he was whining much like a child does when they don't want to do something. I stand by the assertion too.

 

Still, now that I'm here again let me ask something; do they tell you up front that you have to do these class BEFORE you start the course?

 

When I applied to do my degree they gave us a complete course break down of the modules we'd be doing so I'm assuming it works the same way; you are given a break down of the classes which make up your major and then which other classes you need to take a head of time.

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if all these people complaining about the poor social skills of some people, one would think they could use THEIR apparently masterful social skills to work around the kinks and get the most out of the people with limited social skills.

I worked with these people very successfully in college, where the admissions didn't weed them out, but I think you'll find that most tech company's hiring processes are finely tuned to prevent that type of person from stepping through the door.

 

On a purely practical level, I never enjoyed writing papers on literature. I enjoyed reading, and even discussing themes etc, but I would have hated to be tested on it, because I know it would have dragged my grades down.

I wouldn't say I exactly relished such papers, but I always used humanities classes to keep my grades up. Especially once I reached the CS grad courses, and shit got real.

 

No person should be called a child just because he dares to be critical of how a CS program is put together by an institute.

I'm not sure how to else characterise someone who comes and complains on an internet forum about how much his life sucks because he can't do exactly what he wants, other than "childish"...

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I worked with these people very successfully in college, where the admissions didn't weed them out, but I think you'll find that most tech company's hiring processes are finely tuned to prevent that type of person from stepping through the door.

 

I find the hard to believe, especially when more than half of the college grads right now are unemployed right out the gate, regardless of major or to a lesser extent if they took humanities classes or not. You know what? Its extremely hard to get past the HR drones unless you have inside contacts, which is more of the rule than the exception

Edited by ISDCaptain01
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 That also goes for one of the moderators here. No person should be called a child just because he dare to be critical of how a CS program is put together by an institute.

 

Feel free to name me, I know what I wrote smile.png

 

More to the point I didn't say he WAS a child I said he sounded LIKE a child because he wasn't being critical he was whining much like a child does when they don't want to do something. I stand by the assertion too.

Being critical and asking the question "why" is NOT whining. Something I learned taking a degree in languages. The OP is asking why he needs to shed out the money for something he do not plan to utilize.  He is simply questioning the usefulness of the way the CS program/degree is put together. This kind of thinking is very important or we would all just be small ants walking in one direction because our professors say so.

 

By labelling his thread as whining you might end sending a signal that critical thinking is not allowed. This is a common rhetorical technique used in political parties and sects where people who ask "why" will be labelled as whiners(complainers, outsider etc.). I often see this trend by people with degrees and that kind of behaviour very quickly starts to look like how members of political parties or sects behaves in order to silence the critic. 

 

The thread has many good posts by now how one can use other courses than CS in game dev, but please note that most of these posts did not come from you... 

 

So now I ask you, what as a moderator do you get out of calling his words for whining? Do you bring any wisdom to the thread? I mean many great posters here did in fact contribute to the thread with a lot of wise words.

 

You are a moderator, therefore act polite and civilized. You have the power here to control the debate and therefore more than anyone else we the readers and posters rely on your great judgement. You are in fact the guaranty for us to have a great debate climate(or you should be wink.png ).  

 

Do not misunderstand me here, I dearly appreciate many of your great inputs in many threads, but I simply just find that you some times loose your grip a little bit. Please do not take my point of view as an insult. See it more as a suggestion to how you could learn from other great contributors here in the thread smile.png

Edited by Dwarf King
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if all these people complaining about the poor social skills of some people, one would think they could use THEIR apparently masterful social skills to work around the kinks and get the most out of the people with limited social skills.

I worked with these people very successfully in college, where the admissions didn't weed them out, but I think you'll find that most tech company's hiring processes are finely tuned to prevent that type of person from stepping through the door.

 

 

>On a purely practical level, I never enjoyed writing papers on literature. I enjoyed reading, and even discussing themes etc, but I would have hated to be tested on it, because I know it would have dragged my grades down.

I wouldn't say I exactly relished such papers, but I always used humanities classes to keep my grades up. Especially once I reached the CS grad courses, and shit got real.

 

 

No person should be called a child just because he dares to be critical of how a CS program is put together by an institute.

I'm not sure how to else characterise someone who comes and complains on an internet forum about how much his life sucks because he can't do exactly what he wants, other than "childish"...

 

 

Well I found plenty of good inputs here in this thread from other people, so some people seems to know how to. Anyway it is not my job to teach you how to communicate professionally(even though I do have the degree to do so). It is your forums, your rules and therefore I was just putting forward some suggestions to what could be done differently. I shall not write more posts in this thread.

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I find the hard to believe, especially when more than half of the college grads right now are unemployed right out the gate, regardless of major or to a lesser extent if they took humanities classes or not. You know what? Its extremely hard to get past the HR drones unless you have inside contacts, which is more of the rule than the exception

I'm a little insulted that you think I obtained my job through "inside contacts". I was hired after the same interview process everyone else goes through, purely on the basis of my technical abilities and skill in communication - abilities and skills that I have earned through study and hard work.

 

The jobs situation may be that dire in various other fields (many of the humanities included). But in CS there are plenty of companies willing to hire those with the requisite skills - it's a field with 3.5% unemployment, for goodness sake.

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And I hope that last sentence about Computer Science drones was a joke. I pray it was. I'll assume it was.

Actually, I'd say that there's some truth to it. It applies to more than just computer science, too. If all you can talk about is your field, then the only people who will want to talk to you will be in your field and (by definition) the only conversation you'll get will be related to your field. If all you can talk about is your field, I can guarantee that other people will have a lot of difficulty relating to you. Some people might prefer this state of being, of course. I know very few people for whom that is the case. I know even fewer people for whom the idea of socially interacting with such "drones" is a palatable one.

 

 If you honestly for one second think that not taking a college course in a subject makes you completely uneducated in it, then I think this conversation should end here, at least for my sake. The friends I've made in my CS classes are ridiculously diverse people with many different interests and lifestyles I never encountered in my hometown. Just because they major in a science doesn't make them robots. You'd think I wouldn't have to be telling you this, but just because some people act a certain way doesn't mean all people with the same interests act the same way. And I didn't need a humanities class to learn that. I'm done talking about these fake "drones" who don't exist (just because a guy is a drone when he's talking to you doesn't mean he's a drone when he's talking to, say, people he actually likes).

 

Perhaps you've noticed that pointing out problems with another person's ideas is not considered disrespectful here. Perhaps you've noticed that this is a technical forum. Perhaps you've noticed that the entire purpose of (most) technical forums revolves around pointing out problems with other people's ideas in order to help them. This is not a place where we pat each other on the back just for having an opinion. If you post an opinion here, you should expect that someone will eventually point out a problem with your opinion. That's what we do.

Personally, I'm of the opinion that posts that seem like teenage-level whining should be called out as such, so I don't blame people for doing just that if they make such a judgement. I'm sure many of us have had similar feelings to those OP expresses. I'm likewise sure that most of said people have had those feelings called out as detrimental to one's personal growth by our elders, our peers, or even those more junior than us. Personally, I welcome such calling out as useful to clarifying my own self-perception. I would rather have the entire internet tell me that my way of thinking is unhelpful - and therefore be aware of the fact and able to contemplate how to correct it - than remain unaware and potentially fuck myself over later in life.
 
Oh please. Your "this isn't a place to pat people on the back" argument is tired and inappropriate. I didn't pat him on the back. In fact, in my own post, I simply related with the feeling he's going through and offered my opposing opinion on humanities courses, with some perspective. I did it politely and peacefully. I didn't call him a child. I didn't call him a whiner. I didn't tell him that he didn't deserve to go to college. I didn't tell him his problems were worthless.
 
Maybe I can help you out, since you don't seem to understand the point of criticizing another person's ideas. See, the goal is to help the person refine the idea and, in responding to your criticisms, refine your own as well. We do this not just with other people, but with entire structures in our society. We criticize the education we receive because we want it to be better. When my parents tell me I'm doing something wrong, I don't respond to them "Well, if you don't like it, you shouldn't have had me." By the same logic, when a person criticizes his schooling, I don't tell him "If you don't like it, don't go to school." Just because I don't like certain aspects of something doesn't mean I should toss it aside completely. And I'm perfectly within my right to complain about those things I don't like. That's how change happens. Sitting silent and taking it is, ironically, the most drone-like thing to do.
 

Maybe because then you wouldn't have the fun job of just piling on a guy, post after post, joining the horde of "You don't know anything, young blood. You just so stupid and young and oooh."

I'm no longer certain that you and I are reading the same thread.

 

 

Yeah, I agree.

Edited by Shaquil
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if all these people complaining about the poor social skills of some people, one would think they could use THEIR apparently masterful social skills to work around the kinks and get the most out of the people with limited social skills.

I worked with these people very successfully in college, where the admissions didn't weed them out, but I think you'll find that most tech company's hiring processes are finely tuned to prevent that type of person from stepping through the door.

It just seems so contradictory to me with how much "blah blah blah" companies do about professionalism but they can't work around some social skill issues. All the ridiculous crap you have to do at a job but they can't handle a little social limitation? Ridiculous.

 

And I just had to fill out this app and they do this screening for presumably sociopathic tendencies with all these tricky questions but then you look at the behavior of the company/organization and their business practices and it seems so hypocritical. Is it any better to be a manipulative asshole with social skills that you utilize towards that goal than to not have very good social skills? I can tell you that I would take some of those clueless people any day over the psychopaths I and my friends have had to deal with in management.

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ChaosEngine, on 28 Jan 2013 - 10:25, said:
On a purely practical level, I never enjoyed writing papers on literature. I enjoyed reading, and even discussing themes etc, but I would have hated to be tested on it, because I know it would have dragged my grades down.
I wouldn't say I exactly relished such papers, but I always used humanities classes to keep my grades up. Especially once I reached the CS grad courses, and shit got real.

 

I never did a grad course, just a B.Sc in CS/physics and frankly, the CS courses were trivially easy compared to the physics stuff. I still have nightmares about electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. 

 

Overall though, I agree that a broad education is a good thing. If I had some down time, I think I'd go back to uni and do a few courses in industrial design or philosophy.

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If you honestly for one second think that not taking a college course in a subject makes you completely uneducated in it, then I think this conversation should end here, at least for my sake.

What a ridiculous allegation. Nobody has said any such thing.

The friends I've made in my CS classes are ridiculously diverse people with many different interests and lifestyles I never encountered in my hometown. Just because they major in a science doesn't make them robots. You'd think I wouldn't have to be telling you this, but just because some people act a certain way doesn't mean all people with the same interests act the same way. And I didn't need a humanities class to learn that.

I wonder once again if we're reading the same thread. Nobody is saying that all CS majors are drones, or that majoring in a science makes you a robot. I challenge you to find a post which actually says that. What is being said is that some people in CS are drones and that being such a drone is a bad thing.

I'm done talking about these fake "drones" who don't exist (just because a guy is a drone when he's talking to you doesn't mean he's a drone when he's talking to, say, people he actually likes).

They exist. I admittedly know of very few of them in computer science, but they definitely exist in other fields.

And I'm perfectly within my right to complain about those things I don't like. That's how change happens. Sitting silent and taking it is, ironically, the most drone-like thing to do.

Quite right. But it is likewise within our rights to complain about complaining we think is without merit. Right?
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I am here to complain that all this complaining about complaining about complaining is too meta. Let my poor head meat get some concrete thoughts going on dammit!

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And I'm perfectly within my right to complain about those things I don't like. That's how change happens.

Nobody has ever effected change by complaining anonymously on the internet.

 

If you want to change the fact that humanities courses are part of a liberal arts education, how about bringing that up the next time your university's president has on open house? Writing an article outlining your position to your college newspaper, alumni magazine, or an education journal? Or at least complain in some forum where there are a significant number of university professors - as far as I know there are only a handful of us on GDNet who have even taught at the university level, let alone actual professors.

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Employers want "well-rounded" employees.  Because most kids in the USA exit high school vastly underachieving even by youth standards, they are forced to make prospects prove that they got would they should have received in secondary education before applying for college or tech school.

 

 

Some countries such as Japan create excellent high school graduates, safe to say the average one there outperforms most in the USA.  Other countries such as Germany also release well rounded secondary school graduates which outperform and understand better than USA students by quite a gap on average.

 

My response is why you should stay the course since you started in it.  There is no need to change schools or degrees, I say to the young people, but you sure best know what you are entering. 

 

It is very important to show that you complete a plan, project, or curriculum to prospective future employers and partners, even if you hate some of the courses. In real life you will be asked to do many things over the years which you hate to do.  Is it better to do what you love? Yes, but until then keep your nose to the grind stone, because building a good reputation is more important than how you feel about any classes.

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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it's a field with 3.5% unemployment, for goodness sake.

I knew it was low, but holy crap! That's quite phenomenal.

 

That said, I have a CS degree and an Art Minor. I would say Art History was my least favorite art course. I wouldn't blame humanities, you just happened to pick a bad humanities course. I like art and I even disliked the art history courses I took; largely because they are usually structured in very boring ways.

 

There are any number of blogs/articles on why humanities are in the traditional college degree. I would recommend googling about it. You'll probably find some better/more thorough arguments and probably leave with a better understanding of what you should most be taking away from your degree (hint: It's not what you think).

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