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Making money?

12 posts in this topic

Lately I have been thinking if there is any way to make some money.I mean I know c++ and studied directx's apis,right now I'm learning UDK.

However I can't think of any way to make some many other than to make a game.And we all know that making even a simple game requires 2-3 people and some time.

Does anyone have any ideea?
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Some people will sell raw assets (sounds, sprite art, 3D models, textures).  Others will sell plugins or development tools that can be used (Unity, etc).  

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There is also always the possibility of getting a job, or working contracts.

Programming is an in-demand field these days, and you can make good money for relatively little effort, especially in fields like web development, or mobile app development.
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There is also the part-time hobby. You could just open-source it and be the primary maintainer, or develop it in increments and setup a PayPal donation button on a website. Those who want to help make the game better would donate a few dollars here and there.

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Lurk on these forums for awhile, see if you can pick out some of the things that people are constantly asking for and then see if you can devise some marketable solution to those problems.

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There is also the part-time hobby. You could just open-source it and be the primary maintainer, or develop it in increments and setup a PayPal donation button on a website. Those who want to help make the game better would donate a few dollars here and there.

But then it'd just be going into your savings, right?

I always thought, if you're going to use a donation system to raise money for a game project, you should only use the money you get for things directly related to the game.  Things you can't really get for the game by yourself: if you're a programmer, maybe buying art and sound, or to pay for servers (if the game is online), advertising, etc.

But not just to add to your savings as an individual.

Isn't that how people usually do it?

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I always thought, if you're going to use a donation system to raise money for a game project, you should only use the money you get for things directly related to the game.  Things you can't really get for the game by yourself: if you're a programmer, maybe buying art and sound, or to pay for servers (if the game is online), advertising, etc.

 

But not just to add to your savings as an individual.

Your living expenses while you build the game count as costs of its development.

 

Programmers need food, and a place to sleep.

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Indeed, I think it's reasonable to ask for donations even if it's just for your work/time.

But whether anyone will donate when it's available for free is another matter. Usually these only seem to work when there's a clear cause for the money (other than just for the programmer), or when people are having to pay something anyway (e.g., the choose your own price schemes). It doesn't seem something to make enough to live off.

I second the "get a job" suggestion as the best way to make money with this knowledge :)

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Programmers need food, and a place to sleep.

Or if that's too expensive, coffee.

 

Being serious though, if the game is the goal, but you need money, you can find other programming-related jobs and work the game on the side.  Sites like guru.com are great for freelancing programmers, and there should be software work in almost any city since most industries use software at some point in their toolchain.
If the game is just a means to make money, it's not really the fastest way to do it, and games produced just to pad wallets are never as good as someone's passionate, artistic "baby".  Note: that's not the same as having a great idea for a game that you think a lot of people will want to play.  The latter is awesome.

 

I always thought, if you're going to use a donation system to raise money for a game project, you should only use the money you get for things directly related to the game. Things you can't really get for the game by yourself

I've set up a donation page on my own project and outlined exactly what I'm intending to spend it on: hardware and software to improve the workflow/environment and speed up asset production.  I don't expect donations to show up for a long time yet (if ever) but I kind of follow your intent.  It's money I can't afford to spend for things directly related to the game's production, and since I have the dayjob I can't really say "I need the money to eat/sleep/pay my internet bill"

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Programmers need food, and a place to sleep.

 

Being serious though, if the game is the goal, but you need money, you can find other programming-related jobs and work the game on the side.  Sites like guru.com are great for freelancing programmers, and there should be software work in almost any city since most industries use software at some point in their toolchain.

 

Have you actually used a site like guru.com? Is it actually worth doing?

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I checked it out years ago, and then poked my head back in recently when I was looking for some extra income options, and their quality control tools have really improved.  There's a really high volume of international (read: mostly in India) fly-by-night code shops that try to jump on every pitch, but there's a HUGE volume of projects coming and going, and you can tailor your own personal job feed to tell you at a really quick rate when something comes in that's in your expertise areas.  Job pitches also come with ebay-like seller ratings, so you can see how much the site has vetted the user has paid out in job funds already.  I ended up picking up some overtime instead, so I haven't tried to grab anything coming through, but it's definitely worth signing up and tailoring your profile.  Probably 10-20 minutes worth of work.

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I would recommend learning how to make Mobile Applications, if you know how to code in C++ and have dabbled using Game API's then you will find Mobile programming easy as. You wouldn't believe how many small businesses want an app about their business, usually its nothing tricky or complex but just something that is an advertising mechanism, almost a mobile version of their website. They mostly care about the look and a feature that allows them to send users updates and information about their business. But they always want it to work on iOS and Android(sometimes Windows Mobile aswell) so its good to learn a Cross-Platform Mobile API like Mosync(which is in C++). That API was young when I used it, and compiling & distributing to iOS was intensly difficult but the API has matured and its a con I am willing to deal with if I can write one app that works on multiple platforms.

 

If you were to create flyers that say "I can make your small business a Smart Phone App thats looks great, is Cross-Platform and customisable" and distribute those flyers to small businesses around your area or in business parks I guarantee you will get people calling you up and you will be able to charge in the order of thosands of dollars for the app development, whereas online freelance sites you have people out for something that will take the user to Mars and only costs a couple of hundred dollars.

 

Distribute your flyers to cafes, clothing distributers, small trading firms, etc. I guarantee that you will get someone who has been thinking about making an app for their business but haven't acted on it yet, and most of the time the app functionality is superficial, ie nothing complex but just a good looking, interactive advertisement. I would go down this path rather than online freelance sites because you are competing with Indian Programming Firms that bid very low and IMO are produced by code monkeys. You are also dealing with people who give you a vague description of what they want, dont want to liase and meet(Skype) because they are busy and just want it done. Whereas by contacting local small businesses you can meet with them, understand what they want and build relationships where they may want you to make other programs for them(like inventory management applications). Also look into paid internships, in Australia we have something called the Australian Computing Society that advertises paid internships but they are looking for people who are currently doing university in a IT degree so if ur in high school that may not work.

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Well around net you can find a lot of job offerings for programmers in mobile enviroment as many companies are entering that (crowded) area due to huge smartphone market growth.

 

remember to choose something and focus, as divided focus is biggest enemy to efficiency.

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