• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
dtg108

Mind games?

5 posts in this topic

Hello, I was just wondering, how would you feel about a mental crime game? Like the show criminal minds, you wouldn't just shoot, but you'd have to investigate and find the killer? How would you feel about this, and what would be some ways to pull this off?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the crime game is to not to be a passive 'follow the clues' flavor, but one where the players investigatory actions precipitate (re)actions by the criminals/characters (and thus changing the story and possible outcomes).

 

Consider the game of chess and how the context of the current board changes what is to happen next.  Chess has those fixed and relatively simple rules to resolve the actions of the two opponents (even to how the opponent is likely to decide what to do).

 

Unfortunately, anything having to do with humans (their complex emotions/motives/interrelations) is magnitudes more complex to try to resolve what 'should' happen next in response to the players actions/reactions.  (Likewise the internal state of the characters is far more complex as is the ways they can interact).

 

Its the old problem games have faced - .you cannot use generalized AI and have to narrow down and choreograph everything  (at least as far as some simple generalizations can be utilized in narrow contexts like  fight logic).

 

---

 

For 'mind games' I would think that more subtle indicators would be use to try to read the internal mental state of a character versus most games being able to decide by overt actions/motions.   Likewise the actions you take will be more mental with any overt actions implying ideas at a character to manipulate them.

Edited by wodinoneeye
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, your replies really helped. I'm thinking about mixing an Third person shooter style as well, where you would kill the bad guys if needed. Also, I was thinking about making different characters to choose from. EX: Smart guy: solve equations and discovers things. Tough Guy: Does interrogations. Leader: Makes decisions for teams. More classes later. What do you think of this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a lot of thoughts on it. I don't know what the market would be for a game that featured CSI show like characters and also shooting. I had thought that the target demographic for CSI shows were like 40+ people who enjoy TV for their after work decompression...as opposed to video games. That's not a market you are going to sell on a game with shooting elements, I think. (I have ZERO research to back that up; it's just my gut.)

 

Were I you, I'd go for the meat of it first with a prototype. Write up a very short story with some branches (a choose-your-own adventure kind of thing) and go interactive fiction with it. Do a single interrogation where the player can, I'm just making stuff up here...

  • appeal to the suspect by going buddy/buddy with him;
  • put pressure on the suspect;
  • ask a set of questions.

Before the player interrogates, a brief conversation with an associate and/or a review of their "in-game notes" can prime them, maybe present the evidence they already have that they can use to spring a question on the perp that they already know the answer to. That's a pretty big element in shows like that: catching the suspect in a lie puts the interrogator at a huge advantage in those shows.

 

Were I you, I'd spin up a prototype to see how it felt and help me decide where to go from there. I'd also play every game out there even remotely like the idea to get a feel for the environment and build up the questions I'd need to ask myself about design and development. I'd also watch a TON of CSI episodes and take notes about the interrogation scenes.

Edited by thade
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0