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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Joker8

Game programmer

10 posts in this topic

Hello,

I want to be a game programmer.It's my dream.Now I'm learning C++ and I want to ask you what all I must know.What I need to learn?

Thank you and sorry for my english

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  1. Learn several programming languages, but master one (e.g. C++).
  2. Understand data structures, algorithm complexity, maths (linear algebra, algebra, calculus), and how they are relevant to game development.
  3. Make lots of games.
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Just wanted to come back to this topic and I hope I'm not overstepping my boundaries on this one but I have noticed this question arising in quite a few threads and in a few variations.  Kind of lead me to going in to one of my journal ramble fests of sorts where I write a huge article explaining things the way I see them.  It's something I hope will be helpful and I think might help to address some of what you are asking / having problems with as a potential / beginner level programmer.  I call it "The Programming Primer", although much of it may seem like a step backwards for someone who has already started learning a specific language I'd still like to offer it to you and to anyone else who makes their way to this post in search of ideas to "how do I start programming".  Reading never hurts and what is in this entry may give you some helpful ideas and incite as to what people are saying to you on this thread about the general concept of programming.  Give it a read when you have a chance please and feel free to comment and or contact me with your questions or comments as to the article.

 

http://www.gamedev.net/blog/1003/entry-2256027-the-programming-primer/

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Newbies reading this with little or no prior experience:

 

  You need to program simple applications, preferably console ones, before ever starting to make a game. It only takes a few, maybe 3 to 5 of them, and then - only then - will you be ready to start in making a game.  Make "Hello World", simple data base, letter display application, very simple text editor - that sort of thing. Use only a beginner friendly language such as Python, Lua, C#, and so forth.  Stay with only one language until you reach intermediate level of proficiency. Do NOT start with C++!  It could be a good second language after you get an auto-memory management language understood in all the fundamentals.

 

After months or even as long as a year, make 3 to 5  very simple copy-cat games.  Here is a list to consider:

 

Crossword Puzzle

Tic-Tac-Toe

Pong

Tetris

Pac Man

Defender

Asteroids

Donkey Kong

Mario Brothers

Galaxy

 

... or other simple 2D games... Make each one well and add some of your own features before moving to the next one.

 

Stay on the proven path thru the jungle of game development until you have the experience to be a trailblazer or I guarantee that the jungle might eat you for breakfast, lunch, and supper! ... stay on course!

 

You can do this!  Most people have the natural ability to make great improvements over the coming years in game development, so likely you can too!  Stay at it and have fun! biggrin.png

 

 

 

 

 

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Have a solid understanding of C++ fundamentals and how these fundamentals can be applied to games. Question everything you learn in C++ like "why is this useful and how can I use it to make my life as a programmer very easy?" 

 

I started off having this mindset ever since I started programming. Sometimes, you won't have an idea of how to implement the feature to your game. But guess what many people before you probably got stuck on the same problem you have. You can READ posts and threads of how other people solve it. Don't look at the code but read the ideas of the approach. And then start to struggle with how to implement the code yourself now having the ideas in your head. This will improve your thinking! rolleyes.gif

 

Making a game is mostly problem solving! So read , question and apply at the same time!

 

Start off small because #1 you can get it done. #2 I guarantee even the small project will test your ability as a programmer and project scope and time constraints. Whatever you learn in C++, START applying all of those concepts in your game. If you do not apply, you will not remember it. It's how the brain works.

 

Once you learn the procedural programming of C++. I would recommend starting with Java after having the fundamentals of C++ down so you can think in an object-oriented way.

Edited by warnexus
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