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Anyone here a self-taught graphics programmer?

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@turanszkij Oh that's so cool to see you here, I've just found your videos through my youtube recommendations a few weeks ago !

 

Back to the topic:
I guess I don't have to show as much as most others here, but I'm currently "working" on becoming a self-taught graphics programmer :)
I've been messing around for 5 month now with the Vulkan API & Photorealistic rendering.
However, I got no experience with the "standard" way of doing video game graphics (that is, rasterization) but rather with Ray Tracing & more specifically Path Tracing since new year.
I'm currently trying to port my CPU Path Tracer to the GPU, when I got time...

I hope to get some small graphics programmer jobs on upwork or similar portals in the near future ;)
 

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Try and find mentors, people who are better than you who are willing to teach you and help you out. This was something I really craved when I was younger.
Where can you find a mentor online? Not sure people are willing to teach someone their knowledge to some stranger

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some of the best people i've worked with are self taught as well, I don't think it's particularly frowned upon if you've got the goods, getting formally trained does provide an easier path to a career though, but if you're an enterprising sort, you'll figure something out.

I find that my lack of formal training does leave some surprising gaps in my knowledge. Language mastery, for example is something that's taught with rigor, problem solving is really not. I have to ask guys around me about squirrely pointer questions that somehow I've managed to evade for 30 years all the time.
 

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I'm a self-taugh programmer, but in was easier in my "time", started in 81 with an Apple 2 switched in 88 on an Atari ST, became an official Atari dev on Falcon and TT in 93 and since my first program i only worked on game mostly, Farcry 1, star wars, avatar, rainbow 6, farcry primal, farcry 5, to name a few ;p. Left school at 16, so my math is bad. But thanks to Internet if i need something, i just have to search for what i need. 

http://www.mobygames.com/developer/sheet/view/developerId,168167/

And i just started to learn DX11 and get more advanced in shaders.

 

Edited by Enitalp

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Completely self taught here also. Started out on the C64 in the late 80's. Didn't start learning C++ until 2006, playing with Ogre 3D at the same time. Learning both simultaneously was a hard task as I didn't know any of the concepts of either.

Always being interested in way things tick, I tinkered around with DX9c and have now moved on to DX11. Still learning, but have the basics sorted out.

Here is a screenie of a game I have been working on for the past few years. Been chipping away when I feel like it, which is very intermittent. (Also in C++ and DX11).

 

Xtdgtp6.png

I'm quite proud of what I have achieved. Each strand of grass is individually animated and looks awesome swaying gently in the breeze.

I'm certainly no guru though. Still learning new things every day. I am a far cry from the masters that help out on the forums here.

Edited by lonewolff

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I started with AS3 all by myself and as late as at the age of 24, because until that moment everybody was trying to scare me about programming saying that: "To program you have to be a master in mathematics!! It is only for selected geniuses!"(I tried to code one day and all they said to me resulted to be a lie). Then after a month or so, I switched to assembler and there I learned to program for real, all alone again. Then I started to study Java in a university but they kicked me out for reasons not related to my codding skills. After that I started to study in another university this time C# and they kicked me again, no matter I was one of the best students. In those two short periods of studying in universities, they introduced me to HLL. I was shown by teachers about OOP and Unit Testing. Nobody of our teachers was interested in 3D programming and nobody was able to show me how to do it, so I started to learn WebGl and shaders all by myself and it was very challenging to switch to the shaders-way of thinking. It took me one whole week only to realize how interpolation from vertices to pixels is happening without a teacher. But after 6 months, of studying on my own i was able to make this:

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I had to figure out all by myself how shadow mapping and deferred rendering work. It was cool to be the only one in my second school(including the teachers) to be able to do that :) (they could learn how to do it too if they had interest into it, maybe)
Now I am studying directx12 all by myself again.
My life story is very sad in my own opinion, because without the degree, nobody wants to hire me for nothing. I understand that I need to pass through a specialization process in the company, but even when searching for junior positions, nobody calls never. And my CV is empty-forever-alone... I wish I'd have started to study medicine at the age of 24 instead programming. I would be now working in a clean office looking dirty gangrenas, not codding Pipeline State Objects in the basement of my mother's house xD (but this is my own experience in life. other ppl may have different happier life stories)

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