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ISDCaptain01

Anyone here a self-taught graphics programmer?

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Me Too. I started programming with DirectX and C++, learning mostly from tutorials and examples from different places on the internet, and some other tools and languages this year (FYI, I'm 14 right now). And right now I'm working on a (or something similar enough to, or able to speed up any DX 9 Apps I might want to make) Game Engine. And yes of course, I'm still learning what a game engine should be like and how it should be made. Right now I'm still struggling with Mesh Animation, Particle FX (might have made a small mistake somewhere) and the more advanced concepts of 3D transformation, Physics and Mathematics. I also use OpenGL (and I've actually made a 3D app for someone, and gotten paid about $150 in US currency). And I work on an FPS game in Unity3D (Using a tutorial) from time to time.

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I am regularly ( sp ?? ) ignored by companies even if i have a degree in engeneering electrhonics and have been coding program for 20+ years.

The shift in the industry is totally Unity driven, i'd say that someone with a fair amount of Unity and c# experience might get a better job than someone with a degree , i regreted wasting time and money on my education, sad but true

Ummm, you have probably already been asked this but... Have you tried becoming an Indie developer? Or learning how to use Unity3D and any of its associated scripts (seriously its not that hard!).

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A short story of my own:

I began in Python with my schooling, surprisingly my intro course was heavily graphics and gaming based (I'm a mechanical engineer anyway; computer graphics is my hobby). We used a nifty package to do the graphics, so creating 2D games was pretty simple. From there, I worked on software rendering for a while in Java and then C++, before reaching it's limits after about one year of software rendering of 3D geometry, and switched over to openGL. I enjoyed this decision I made; I learned a lot of the mathematics and theory behind most basic techniques in computer graphics, and I tend to do CPU techniques when I learn something new before porting it over to the GPU. ALso, the books I have built up have definitely led to a beautiful, compact library that I can constantly reference when working. Currently I'm working on a voxel terrain engine in C++ and openGL! :)

 

Not considering my first python course (which did not teach much of anything to do with computer graphics), I am completely self-taught. I feel like I get more out of it that way; I'm not forced to learn it; I learn what I want when I want!! I do hope to get to learn how to read others' code...and maybe a little bit of team experience when it comes to coding...but I don't regret any decision to keep this to a hobby.

 

--ST

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Cool stories. I will try to be brief.

 

I am a self-taught programmer. In 2006, I got my first programming job, as a game programmer. I mostly worked on tools and gameplay programming. Toward the end of that job (the company unfortunately folded in 2009), I dipped my toe into some basic graphics programming (wrote a fairly nifty water shader for an XBox 360 game we were working on).

 

In 2009, I landed a job at a company that makes training simulators. My job title is Graphics Programmer, but in practice I do a lot of programming that is only peripherally related to graphics. I've spent a lot of time, for example, writing UI code for our level editor (dragging and dropping items into the scene, picking, rotating and moving objects, etc.). Obviously, there is some 3D math involved with picking and manipulating models, but it is not what most people would call "graphics programming" per se. I was merely chosen for those tasks because no one else in the company really had the skill set for it.

 

As far as actual graphics programming is concerned, we use OpenSceneGraph, and so there is constantly this layer between our code and OpenGL. However, I have found it extremely important to know OpenGL in order to get effective use out of OpenSceneGraph. My colleague and I have been able to somewhat modernize the visuals for our product, adding in things like normal mapping and deferred shading. However, my colleague and I are at about the same level, in terms of experience with graphics programming, and so neither has the benefit that Hodgman had of learning from someone vastly more experienced than ourselves -- a benefit of which I am tremendously envious!

 

Then again, I have learned so much from Hodgman's own blog, and for that I am very thankful. =D

I never did obtain a degree, but I started going to school for Physics in 2010 and I'm a little more than halfway through now.

 

Edit: I meant MJP's blog. I learn a lot from both of them on the message board, though. 

Edited by CDProp

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I do 2D stuff... No formal qualifications, i just love it... I started doing 'worms' animations on Deluxe Paint... got into web design, then did games on the side and now I have an online store selling 2D game assets at http://www.graphic-buffet.com

 

I still have a 'proper' job but I love doing game graphics!

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Truly neat topic!

I'm a completely self taught programmer and well I can't possibly have a degree anyway because I'm just 16, I'm in my last year of high school. I am mainly a C# programmer although I can also work with Java,C,C++ and Python.

 

I started learning programming about 5 years ago, I was into playing a lot of video games, then I got GTA San Andreas which wouldn't run on my computer because my machine was too old, it made me wonder why it wouldn't run, this led to research (on a dial up connection) I found out about BASIC and started doing some basic (pun intended) programming in it, however I didn't find it to be powerful enough for what I expected so I stopped, then a few months later our computer teacher began teaching us the basics of C++ (which never really worked out because he didn't know much himself, he just used the cprogramming.com tuts). This peaked my interest in programming again, I tried C++ but couldn't make much of it but I ended up discovering C#, I bought a few books about it and learned the basics, I go Visual Studio only to find out that my computer could barely handle it, this slowed my development a lot, eventually I gave up and went back to playing games.

 

Then I discovered Midtown Madness mods, I learned how to use zmodeler to make my own mods, soon I moved on to blender, then when I visited my sister at new york, she gave me her laptop which was quite recent (it's only about 2-3 years old), finally able to do things faster, I went back to C#, I quickly got used to it and started programming things on a daily basis (one project a week however most are still incomplete), then I got involved in the PSP hacking scene, it was a bit hard to get the basics of things like MIPS assembly (not to mention the fact that C/C++ were still incomprehensible to me) but I managed to figure everything out, then I got a PS Vita and a few months later PlayStation Mobile was launched. PSM  used C# which attracted me to the platform, that's where my 3d graphics adventure began. Along with a friend, I created Aperture Studios and we are currently working on our first title (and a 3d game engine) and very recently (infact a few days ago) I gave C++ a go again to find out that I properly understand everything!,

 

Anyway here's a video of what we have so far:

 

[media]http:

[/media]

Edited by hgoel0974

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I am.

 

I did not study. I had a large interest in cross platform way of doing games and graphics. So I stumbled upon OpenGL.

I just started learning it over Nehe. Then with the years, I expanded my knowledge and so on and so forth.

Was pretty exciting, but I am nowhere as good as professionals. 

I can do quite some stuff with OpenGL though :):

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A humble outcome of my work in the world of graphics programming wink.png

 

Cheers,

MK

Edited by -=cmaster.matso=-

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