• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
RealityFails

C++ Question

4 posts in this topic

I have about 10% experience with basic computer programming. What I want to know is, how to I do I transitition to game programming?

 

Say if I were to learn C++ 100% from a computer programming angle. Would that in anyway help me with game programming?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Car analogy!

 

 

You want to work on Formula 1 race car engines.

 

You need to start by mastering how to work on a simple car engines.

Then you need to master high performance engines.

Finally you can move on to the Formula 1 race car engines.

 

 

Back to the topic:

 

Games are computer programs, often with soft-realtime requirements, intensive graphics and audio and animation and network requirements, and so on.  Or they can be as simple as a "choose your own adventure" stream of text blobs.

 

You need to start by mastering how to write simple programs.

Then you need to master more advanced topics.  They may include networking, graphics, audio, and so on.

Finally you can move on to the big fancy MMORPGRTS you are imagining.

 

 

 

You transition up by taking on progressively bigger tasks.  Exactly what those tasks are and how you decide to progress is up to you.

Edited by frob
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have about 10% experience with basic computer programming. What I want to know is, how to I do I transitition to game programming?
 
Say if I were to learn C++ 100% from a computer programming angle. Would that in anyway help me with game programming?

I can’t figure out what you are trying to ask.
Firstly I think your question is, “If I learn to program, does that help me with programming games?”, and the answer is so obvious that I reconsider the semantics of your choice of words. I mean there is no way you just asked, “I want to program games, so should I learn how to program?”.

You are obviously asking something else so I read the words more carefully.  Does “C++” have more meaning than I thought?  Are you asking if C++ would be better than, say, C#?  No…

 

What about “computer programming” vs. “game programming”?  Since game programming is computer programming (even on mobile) I didn’t think twice about this at first, but taking a closer look, did you mean to ask about the nuances between standard application/database/financial programming vs. game programming?  There are certainly differences there…

 

 

I don’t know what you are asking, but the blanket answer is that anything you learn…

…helps.

 

 

L. Spiro

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also just to chime in a bit here, no one in the world knows 100% of C++.  Programming isn't mastery of available techniques and technologies it's the understanding of problem solving as it pertains to software.  This includes knowing the basics extremely well to a point where no matter what the problem handed to you (or design concept) that you can relate that down to it's fundamentals, take that idea do your research and turn it in to reality.  A simple way to gauge your readiness is by the questions you ask yourself and of others.  While you still find yourself asking extremely vague questions and getting theoretical responses you're no where near ready yet.  When you get to the point where you ask concise and direct questions and get answers that fix the issue you are having is when you are getting close.  When you get to the point where you're not asking as many questions rather hitting the web and answering it yourself then your ready.

 

**Edit**

Forgot to mention this is the same for nearly every aspect of game development and not just related to programming.  To develop a game you are overcoming a challenge of taking an idea, making technology that supports doing what you are trying to accomplish and presenting that to your players.  Even in the concept designing of a project when you are creating the idea of a game and you are thinking of things like "Strength + Weapon Power - Weapon Damage = Attack Force" <~ That's the same thing.  You are taking an idea "How much damage is dealt" and answering it with an equation that makes the calculation of the number possible.  Knowing how to program is knowing how to make the computer do the thing you are describing, knowing how to "design" or "develop" is the art of making answers to questions.  Yes programming knowledge will always help you but in itself is not very useful to game teams.  Many people want to hand you an idea "Make me an RPG system that is based on cool down abilities and live action combat GO!".  In larger studios they might employ a designer to sketch out words that define how this happens and a programmer to take that definition and make a piece of computer code that does it.  In smaller studios they expect that guy to be one in the same.  As a programmer the larger studio doesn't so much care how much you know on paper they want to see the games you have made in the past.  As such designing and coding a lot of times go hand in hand.  There are other paths to take to get into the industry but unless you have real artistic talent with graphics or audio programming / designing is the easier option.

Edited by Dan Mayor
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to make games, the language is pretty much immaterial.  Learning "how" is most important.  Eventually you will find that most of the big games are C/C++ and if that is your goal, go for it.  In general though, language has no determination of the possibility of making a game, it only provides limits as to how much the game can achieve.  Java, C#, Python etc can all make excellent games, the only reason to worry about C/C++ is getting closer to the metal and making games which require considerably more CPU power utilization than the higher level languages allow.  Learning how to program in any language is your first step.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0