• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
geoteam

getting better at c++

10 posts in this topic

I want to get better at coding. I code in c++ and I know the language well but i need a tutorial or something that will help me get better at programming, (not the actual language but at programming part). any help would be greatly appreciated. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your title is quite contradictory to what you ask for in your post, you say you want to focus on the programming part in your post while the title says you want to get to know the language better.

 

If you want to really get better at programming you should step away from the learning materials which try to hold your hand (ie. tutorials) and dive into the more serious stuff.

 

Assuming we're talking about actual programming concepts, there are some things I believe every beginner programmer should take a look at.

First of all it might be good idea to broaden your horizon when it comes to programming paradigms. Opposed to what many newer (and even more experienced) programmers seem to think, OO is not the perfect solution to every single programming problem out there, and it'll be definitely worth your while to look at other paradigms and what their positive and negative points are. Problems which would be perceived as difficult to solve in OOP can suddenly become really easy when using another paradigm.

I'd definitely recommend experimenting with languages like Lisp or Prolog (among others), as these can be real eye-openers for more OO-minded programmers.

 

Second of all, it can never hurt to learn about your basic algorithms and data structures, if you haven't already done so. Knowledge about algorithms for sorting, searching, shortest-path problems, etc. can be very valuable to you throughout your programming career as they'll allow you to solve a lot of common problems in an efficient manner.

 

All of this will only make you a better programmer if you constantly program though, so that should be priority #1.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you feel you getting better on C++, it's time to learn some external API or Library wink.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is better to make something before going any deeper. Because when you read about more advanced techniques, designs, or different approach  you need to know the problem they're trying to tackle, otherwise all you are going to think is "How the hell does this helps me? Where can I apply all of this?".

 

You won't know what they're talking about until you start coding larger projects and hit those rocks yourself. Then you can read more advanced topics that will help you solve those problems and since you know what details you have to pay attention to, you'll probably learn more too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My suggestion is you cruise a place like sourceforge.net, looking for open source projects to contribute to. What you need is practice. Wax on. Wax off. Contributing to an open source project helps you and helps the project.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something you should learn is design patterns (see gang of four). Then you could try to implement an advanced algorithm like A* pathfinding. While the basics are easy (this tutorial is excellent imo and covers all the basics) there's much room for optimization. You can also try to write an advanced number class, which supports imaginary numbers. That way you learn overloading operators.

 

When you're done with, try out some APIs, maybe get into game programming using a free game engine (irrlicht is a good engine for beginners). You'll learn a lot about good api architectures just by using others.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Before starting either Lisp or Prolog, it is better to get a good grasp of the math logic they are built on. Concepts to look out for in math are:
Set Theory http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_theory, which will prepare you for the map and reduce(aka fold) techniques on which functional programming heavily leans.
First order Logic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_order_logic, which Prolog and any logical programming language are based on.

Algorithm design is another important field to focus on for which this book is an excellent introduction: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introduction-Algorithms-T-Cormen/dp/0262533057/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1360103335&sr=8-1-spell
It starts off with the normal search algorithms but will move into algorithm complexity analysis and more advanced algorithm construction after that and ending in graph theory.

Automatons and formal languages is also an interesting thing to look at, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automata_theory. These will teach the ideas in state based systems and language design (practical for the parser and lexer stages in a compiler).

Even though most of these topics sound utterly boring and abstract once you understand the abstract concepts the actual implementation of these concepts become far easier, at least that is what I found. Edited by NightCreature83
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On-line tutorials are not good for learning to program. They can explain techniques, but don't explain what techniques you should know and apply in the first place.

 

A number of people have recommended books, and this is the right aproach. Practice is important too.

Edited by King Mir
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0